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ART NOVEAU

Although I have labelled this section Art Noveau, I consider decanters from the Arts and Craft, Aesthetic and Art Noveau in the same genre. Essentially a part of the movement was away from glass cutting and more to towards thinly blown glass with decanters being made in interesting shapes. The idea of this genre was that you would see the glass for the ductable material is it, and not honed into flat planes.

The decanters shown in this section range from 1870-1910. To be honest I find it frequently difficult to put dates on this glass.

This glass is delicate and beautiful, but I wouldn't use it on a regular basis for fear of breaking it.

Decanters

This is a pair of bell shaped decanters with a blown ovoid stopper and trefoil pouring lip. They have no cutting other than the fitting of the stopper and the polished pontil mark.

This decanter is from a different art movement from the previous bell shaped decanters, whilst the others might be considered Gothic in style, these are atuned to the Aesthetic Movement. It is light unornamented, and here less is more.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a pair footed ovoid decanters with blown ovoid stoppers and trefoil pouring lip. They are etched withs bands of styliased leaves and flowers, the etching is matched on the stopper. Made late 19th century.

Also from the same aesthetic movement as the previous bell shaped decanters these might be considered a little over ornamented to be truely representative of that movement.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a footed shaft and globe decanter beautifully etched with flying birds and rock crystal cutting of pine cones and branches. The stopper is a blown ball with matching rock crystal cutting of pine branches. Made late 19th century, probably by Thomas Webb.

It is not entirely clear in this picture but the rock crystal cutting is of a high quality and this is a very pretty decanter. When I bought this decanter I was told it was made be Thomas Webb, but I haven't see anything to prove that.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

These are footed ovoid decanters with wrythen moulding up the body and neck, with four dimples and a feathered neck ring. They also have similar hollow ball stopper with a small knop on the top. Made Late 19th Century.

I have seen this pattern has been ascribed to Whitefriars and to John Walsh Walsh. These were purchased with glasses and a jug, and is amongst Whitefriars glasses in the Museum of London and in the John Walsh Walsh Book (see bibliography). It is listed in the Christies Partington Collection Catalogue as Whitefriars. These decanters also aren't in either of the Whitefriars books, and as they are not uncommon they should be. The David Leigh Decanters book does describe the decanter as Whitefriars and I am willing to go with that as it seems he knows what is he is doing.

Reference: Christies, The Parkingon Collection Part II, 8th APril 1998, Lot 320

Reference: Decanters 1760-1930, David Leigh, Page 31

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, Page 32

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Stuart and Sons, footed, gourd shaped decanter with vertical optical moulding, six prunts in a horizontal band, a milled neck ring, and silver pouring lip. Made in 1889. The stopper is not original

This decanter is illustrated in British Glass 1800-1914 in a drawing dated 1889. Just to confirm that the silver collar is hallmarked Birmingham, 1889, maker John Grinsell & Sons, Victoria Works, St, George's, Birmingham. This means that Stuart's and the silversmith Grinsell's worked together, but how much of a regular partnership this would be, I don't know.

I have added a stopper to give it proportion, but the original stopper would have been blown with prunts on to match the body of the decanter. It is quite a small decanter, probably for liquer.

Reference: British Glass 1800-1914, Charles R Hajdamach, Page 266

Height: 7.5 inches, without stopper.

Width: 3 inches

This is a cased glass decanter of amethyst over clear glass intaglio cut with grapes and vine leaves with four dimples to the body. The blown mushroom stopper is is also radially cut to the top. Possibly made by Stevens and Williams circa 1900-1910.

This is a beautiful quality decanter that was made in other variations, as I have seen numerous versions of this decanter in different colours and with different motifs. It is most regulary ascribed to the maker Stevens and Williams but I have yet to see a real reference for it.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal shaft and globe decanter, with rib moulded body with four dimples between each of which is an applied uranium green rigaree trail and silver collar. The stopper an in upright leaf with an applied and crimped uranium green edge. Silver collar hallmarked London 1897.

This is an invogue decanter of the period by Stuart Crystal. It is as good as anything made by Whitefriars glass. Unfortunately the silver makers mark is too indistinct to make out.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 412

Height: 10 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal shaft and globe decanter, with rib moulded body with four dimples between each of which is an applied uranium yellow rigaree trail and an applied uranium yellow neck ring. The stopper an in upright leaf with an applied and crimped uranium yellow edge. Made circa 1890-1900.

A smaller version of the above decanter, with all the making the same except on a smaller scale.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 412

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a tapered decanter with molded spiral ridges running down the body with notches cut into the tops of the ridges. The stopper is a flattened leaf shape that has been twisted into a spiral with notches cut in the edge. Made possibly make by Stevens and Williams circa 1900.

I am sure that somewhere in my reference library I have seen this described as a Stevens and Williams decanter. Whoever made it, it is a very together design with the notched spiral motif following up the body and onto the stopper.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a John Walsh Walsh conical decanter with a trefoil pouring lip and etched with shooting stars running down the body. The stopper has matching shape and etching. Made late 19th century.

This decanter is better in person than in a photo as the etching of the shooting stars is so fine. No date is given for the factory pattern book this decanter is illustrated in, so the date given is pure speculation on my part.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 97

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a pair footed ovoid decanters with blown ovoid stoppers and trefoil pouring lip. They are etched withs bands of styliased leaves and flowers, the etching is matched on the stopper. Made late 19th century.

Also from the same aesthetic movement as the previous bell shaped decanters these might be considered a little over ornamented to be truely representative of that movement.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a pair footed ovoid decanters with blown ovoid stoppers and trefoil pouring lip. They are etched withs bands of styliased leaves and flowers, the etching is matched on the stopper. Made late 19th century.

Also from the same aesthetic movement as the previous bell shaped decanters these might be considered a little over ornamented to be truely representative of that movement.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a pair four lobed wrythen decanters with no pouring lip. The stoppers wrythen elipses.. Made circa 1900-14.

My wife thinks these look rude in some way, but I don't know what she is talking about..

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

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