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GUEST CARAFES

Guest carafes are not a thing anymore so you may not know what I am talking about. Historically if people even had a tap in the house it was in the kitchen, and there was also no electricity, if you wanted a drink in the night you were out of luck. Guest carafes are deisgned for a person to take up to their bedroom in the night. They are just for one person and hence are smaller.

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CARAFES

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Description, References and Size

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe with three neck rings and a polished pontil. This carafe has a wide throat and couldn't be mistaken for a decanter. Made circa.1800.

Again, this is a classic little carafe and you don't see too many of them, if you are collector buy it when you see it.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 34

Height: 5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe with two neck rings and a polished pontil. Made circa.1800.

You may not agree with me, but what I like about this little carafe is its honest condition. It has some bloom in the neck where years of water evapourating has etched the surface of the glass, and all the visible scratches on the not so smooth glass. I could get the bloom polished out, but it doesn't make financial sense, especially for a prolific low life collector like me.

The other thing I can tell you about this carafe is that two rings are not as desirable as three. If the condition of this carafe were similar to the one above this would be the cheaper one.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 34

Height: 5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe, with a single neck and petal moulding to its lower body. Made late 1800-20.

I am making a bold presumption with this dating, as this is the period when petal moulding was more common on glasses. Without a definite date atribution this is not a valuable piece of glass, i.e. it has almost no value.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a small drop shaped carafe with a star cut base, hobnail cut body, and step cut shoulders and neck. Made circa.1820s

This is classic Regency cut glass taking advantage of new stream powered cutting machines we have deep cut sharp hobnails, and total coverage of the bottle in cutting.

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe, with three neck rings, panel cut shoulders, and a ribbed moulded body. It has a polished pontil mark. Made circa.1830s

Sadly someone scratched the hell out of the interior of this carafe so the full value of the optical moulding is not apparent. I have tried to have it professionally cleaned but to no avail.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is an uranium green shaft and globe shaped carafe, with two neck rings and a pillar moulded body. Made circa.1830-50.

I have dated this carafe on the basis that the pillar moulding is like that on the bell shaped pillar moulded decanters which first came in the 1830s, but went on in production until the 1860s-70s. Although this type of pillar moulding was coming in the 1830s necks rings were on their way out, which is why I have put a top date of 1850 on it.

The reason it is called uranium green is that this colour is made by adding uranium ore to the glass mix. This has a small percentage of the isotope used in nuclear power stations, so if you shine an ultraviolet light on it, it will glow in the dark.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 338

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 401

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe, with an annulated neck ring and a pillar moulded body. Made circa.1840-60.

This is from the same family as the carafe above but I have moved in it on 10 years date wise as it has shape that I would consider more of your classic Victorian guest carafe, with a more round body.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 4.75 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe, with a thick single squared ring at the base of the neck, printies cut on the neck and panel cut shoulders. It has star cutting over the pontil mark. Made circa.1840s.

This is a solidly made carafe, ideal for the bedside table. This carafe is clearly showing the wear and tear of a couple of hundred years of use. When glass has had this much utility it doesn't usually survive.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a squat shaft and globe shaped carafe, with wide panels cut into the shoulders, slice cut neck and a morning star cut pontil. Made circa 1840s.

This is slightly better quality than the carafe above but somehow it has escaped the ravages of time. When you see old glass like this in this good a condition you need to look at it carefully and be happy that it is not a reproduction. To be honest regardless of its great condition this is not a valuable thing.

You may have noticed that I mentioned the pontil is cut with a morning star. A conventional star cut pontil is a bunch of radially cut elipses all cut the same size the start being made up of the elipses. With a morning star you not only have the points of the elipses but the elipses are cut in varying lengths to create points in this case making the shape of a 6 pointed star.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a mould blown shaft and globe shaped carafe, with body moulded with swags and faux neck ring. Made circa 1840s-60s.

This is really crap, but that is what makes it great. Most crap that like this has long since been thrown in the bin. From a quality point of view, cheap and nasy, but from a collecting point of view difficult to replace. That doesn't mean it has a lot of value though.

The moulding might be a Thomas Webb pattern called Festoon that they first started producing in 1844.

Reference: British Glass 1800-1914, Charles R. Hajdamach, Page 532

Height: 6 inches

Width: 4.75 inches

This is a mould blown shaft and globe shaped carafe, with body moulded with a diamond pattern and an applied neck ring. Made circa 1840s-60s.

This is a step up on the one above because it has an applied neck ring, the difference being that after was blown in the mould someone had apply strip of glass to the neck and smooth it. This is quite nicely done, so it does mean someone with a modicom skill was involved in the making. It probably added a farthing to the price or some such. For those that don't know a farthing is a quarter of a penny.

The moulding might be a Thomas Webb pattern called Large Diamond that they first started producing in 1850.

Reference: British Glass 1800-1914, Charles R. Hajdamach, Page 532

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe, with a thick single ring at the base of the neck, and no other decoration. It has a polished pontil mark. Made circa.1850-60s.

A nice simple design for this period. You will notice this neck ring has a kind of rim as the top and bottom and this was more common feature as the time I dated this carafe for. You may also notice that one of the moulded carafes is trying to fake this ring. This is how it rolled before there were proper designers, people in the factories woudl occasionally innovate but there would be lots of copying and if not straight up copying lots of features were copied.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 336

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a club shaped carafe, with a thick single squared ring at the base of the neck, slice cut neck and body. It has star cutting over the pontil mark. Made circa.1860s-70s.

This is a small carafe, so not particularly useful. These are uncommon, and prices can vary a lot, depending on how much the dealer wants to get rid of it.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 336

Height: 7 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a club shaped carafe, with a thick single faceted ring at the base of the neck, slice cut neck and body. It has star cutting over the pontil mark. Made circa.1860s-70s.

This carafe is exactly the same size as the one above with a some variation in the neck ring and proportions. In a way this is not designed in the tradional sense of things, I suspect that some bod in the factory knocked it up and then lots of factories copied it, hence you see similar things with minor variations. The thing to realise about this stuff is it's not like collecting stamps, you will probably never know who made it, and there is no collect them all, as there is no book with them all in. Just buy what you like.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 336

Height: 7 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a shaft and globe shaped carafe, with a single row of oval printies around the body. It has a polished pontil mark. Made late 19th century.

When it comes to carafes this is near the bottom of the pile of what it is possible to buy. This was designed as a water carafe and would have originally had a slightly rounded tumbler that was designed to sit upside down over the top. The tumblers must have been more easily broken as you don't see many, especially with their original carafe.

Height: 6.25 inches

Width: 5 inches

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