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CYLINDER DECANTERS 1800-1850

During the post 1800 Georgian period cylinder decanters were relatively rare with the Prussian decanter shapes being dominant, however by 1830 they must have been churning them out by the million as there are some common patterns you see a lot of. I have given them their own section as you do see a lot of them in the antiques world, usually with the wrong stopper in them, and wrong date attributed to them.

Cylinder decanters are good practical decanters if you are looking for something to use on the table. If they are one pint size or have the wrong stopper they should only cost a few pounds. A good plain one with the right stopper should be south of fifty pounds. If you really are looking for one, apart from the first two here you should be able to get anyone of these decanters for under fifty pounds. If it is more than that move on, you will find another. This is history that you can afford to put on the your table without panicking about damage. Just don't put them in the dishwasher.

Decanters

This is a Georgian cylinder decanter with no cutting apart from the polished pontil mark and three neck rings. It has a cut bullseye stopper. Made Circa 1800.

Cylindrical decanters are not a common shape at the time this was make, but the lack of ornamentation, the neck rings and quality of the decanter places firmly into the late Georgian period.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 126 & 262

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a cylindrical shaped decanter with no cutting and two annulated neck rings and two pulley rings around the body. It also has a cut bullseye stopper. Made Circa 1810.

Some books describe annulated neck rings as triple rings. I think this is confusing because most Georgian decanters have 3 neck rings, so I am going with the other descriptive I have seen, annulated.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 211

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a Regency cylinder shaped decanter c.1820-30. It has tightly cut rays on the base, vertical grooves cut to the body, step cut shoulders and the pouring lip has a milled edge. The stopper is a solid mushroom with tight cut grooves radiating from the top.

Step cut shoulders are another classic cutting style of the Regency period, and was much copied by the revival of Georgian styles in c.1900-40, so watch out for copies. As this cutting is labour intensive any such copies would generally be of good quality and worth purchasing even if they don't have as much history in them.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Regency cylinder shaped decanter with a pillar cut body, panel cut shoulders and step cut neck. The stopper is a blown mushroom with pillar cut sides and cartwheel cut on top. Made circa 1820s.

Pillar cutting is a Regency classic cut. Apparently it came in with steam cutting because there was the power to do it, but polishing all those pillars was expensive so it died out. Obviously that could be total BS, but it was what I read somewhere.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 250 & 308

Reference: English Glass, R.J.Charleston, plate 53.c

Height: 10.25 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a Regency cylinder shaped decanter with cut arched panels cut to the body, panel cut shoulders, and cushion cut neck. The stopper is a blown mushroom with slice cut sides and cartwheel cut top. Made circa 1820s.

This decanter has many standard features of Regency decanters in an unusual configuration but is a hansome and heavy decanter.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 308

Reference: English Glass, R.J.Charleston, plate 53.c

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Nelson type cylindrical decanter with broad flute cutting to the body, shoulders and neck and single neck ring at the base of the neck. It has a solid facet cut mushroom. Made Circa 1830-1840.

The thing that makes this a Nelson type in the single neck ring. I suppose it has something to do with Nelsons column.

This decanter comes with a salutory tale about ebay. I bought this decanter for 99p plus postage from eBay from a person with a very low transaction score. The had wraped it in some paper and polythene and then some cardboard was wrapped around that and then it was posted. It arrived with a big chunk off the stopper. If you are a person that is selling glass, remember it is a brittle material and it needs to be posted in a box, and if there is more than one component you must make sure they cannot collide. I have glued the bit back on for this photo, but typing this is still making me sad.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 264 & 308

Reference: English Bottles & Decatners 1650-1900, Derek C Davis, page 68

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Royal type cylindrical decanter with vertical grooves to the body, flute cutting to shoulders and three neck rings. It has a blown hollow mushroom with radial cutting to the top. Made Circa 1830-1840.

This is one of the standard decanters of the period, that you see so many of hanging around in antique centres, quite often with the wrong stopper. If you see one with the right stopper, as pictured, I say snap it up, as eventually people will realise (in my dreams) that the ones with the original stoppers are getting quite rare.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 308 & 324

Reference: How to Identify English Drinking Glasses & Decanters 1680-1830, Douglas Ash, page 189

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 63

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a Royal type cylindrical decanter with vertical grooves surmounted by lens to the body, flute cutting to shoulders and three neck rings. It has a blown hollow mushroom with radial cutting to the top. Made Circa 1830-1840..

This decanter is the same as the one above apart from the added cut lens. I expect customers went to the glass merchants and paid an extra 6d or some such for each additional cutting feature that was added. Or it was a special deal with the lens added for free, over and above the standard cutting.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 308

Reference: How to Identify English Drinking Glasses & Decanters 1680-1830, Douglas Ash, page 189

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a Royal type cylindrical decanter with vertical grooves to the body, with lens cut at the top and bottom, flute cutting to shoulders and three neck rings. It has a blown hollow mushroom with radial cutting to the top, and lens cut to the sides. Made Circa 1830-1840.

The salesman have run a real pitch on the original buyer of this decanter, as it the standard Royal type just with more lens cut into it. They must have paid extra 1/6 for this one.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 308

Reference: How to Identify English Drinking Glasses & Decanters 1680-1830, Douglas Ash, page 189

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a Regency cylinder decanter with a radially cut base, gothic arches cut to the body, panel cut shoulders, and three neck rings. The stopper is a mushroom with radial cutting. Made circa 1830.

Decanters like this one were popular from the 1820s through to about 1850, so why do I consider this to be an early one. The stopper of is of an early type of mushroom stopper and appears slightly out of step with the decanter. I have looked at it carefully and am happy it had been in this decanter a long time. I originally thought gothic arches on glass was later, but I have now seen hallmarked cruets from late 1820s with similar arches on them. This makes me believe this is a Regency as opposed to early Victorian decanter.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 250 & 308

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Royal type cylindrical decanter with intermittent vertical pillars to the body, interspersed with lens, and patterns, grooved patterns cut to the to shoulders and three neck rings. It has a blown hollow cylindrical stopper cut with grooves. Made Circa 1830-1840.

Whilst a standard Royal type in basic pattern, the cutting on this one is a step away in complexity and is quite hansome for it.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 308

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

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