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GEORGIAN

For this website around about 1750 in the Georgian period is the beginning, as I have never seen anything I can afford that was older. Also from the point of view of decanters as we know and might use today this is the beginning.

In general Georgian decanters are not particularly practical to use until the end of the period unless you are going to empty the contents quickly, as the stoppers tend not to be air tight. In addition to the sense of history that you may get with Georgian decanters, they tend to have light and aesthetic designs. The designs were driven by two things, tax and technology. Through most of the Georgian period glass was taxed by weight at the mouth of the glass furnace making heavy glass pieces expensive, also through much of the earlier period glass cutting was powered by foot treadles and consequently glass cutting tended to be shallow.

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Decanters

This is a shouldered shaped decanter, etched around the body with floral swags and single band of foliage around the neck. The stopper is missing and it would probably have been a solid disk, ball or tear shaped. Made circa 1750.

A beautiful historic piece. On close inspection its age is obvious with the quality of the glass not being great. At the time this was made glass cutters with coming to the UK from the continent and I would like to think that this was etched by some skilled worker from Bohemia or Southern Germany. On the other hand I could be completely wrong.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 121

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a sugarloaf shaped decanter with a lozenge shaped stopper and with absolutely no cutting. The lozenge stopper is roughly fitted and slightly loose. Made circa. 1760.

If you are looking for an early decanter it doesn't get much more minimalist than this. The sugarloaf shape and slightly everted pouring lip are a classic for this period. The shape name sugarloaf can attributed to the solid conical shaped blocks of sugar that were imported to the UK from the West Indies at that time.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 98-101

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a shouldered shaped "Lynn" decanter with no cutting but a deep kick in the base and horizontal ribbed molding. It has a crudely etched cartoche with the word PORT in it. The stopper is one I have added, but I would expect the original to be a similar shape and size. Made circa. 1760

Early glass this horizontal molded ribbed characteristic is reported to be from a 18th century glass house based in Kings Lynn. Some dispute whether or not this is entirely true and just a wives tale, but all such glass comes under the descriptive of Lynn glass. The shape, quality, deep base kick, and slightly everted lip pushes this example to be quite early. In general it is quite rare, and top money has to paid for good examples.

There is a Lynn decanter with this same etching in the Ward Lloyd book and apparently such decorated Lynn decanters are extremely rare. It's a pity mine is so small, doesn't have the original stopper and has crack in the base. Oh well, riches will call another time.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 102

Reference: A Wine-Lover's Glasses, The A.C. Hubbard Jr. Collection, Ward Lloyd, page 56

Height: 9.25 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a tapered shaped decanter cut all over the body with find flutes to the base, bordered by horizontal grooves, surmounted by shallow hobnails, surmounted by cut panels that end in swags. The neck has two shallow hobnail cut faux neck rings with a continuation of the panel from the shoulders between them. The disc stopper has lunar cutting to the edges. Made circa. 1790.

This is a huge decanter that you might just cram two bottles into. At the time it was made it was probably massively expensive too. For all its size and profuse cutting, the tapered shape and the shallowness of the cutting has given it an elegent fine dining style.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 179

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4.75 inches

This is a tapered shaped decanter. The base is cut with horizontal flutes and has three rows of small printies cut around the neck. It also has a band of stylised foliage etched around the waist between etched borders. The lozenge stopper has a cut edge. Made circa. 1790.

A small one pint decanter that is right in period. It might be an early Irish decanter.

Underneath it has a paper label with Wm. H. Plummer & Co. Ltd. New York City, ANTIQUE DEPT. ENGLISH 1790. By the power of eBay this was repatiated from the USA. All I have been able to find out about Plummers is that they stuck labels on a lot of antiques and had a court case against them in the 1960s.

Height: 10.25 inches.

Width: 3 inches

This is a prussian shaped decanterwith no cutting. The neck has three applied feathered neck rings. The disc stopper has lunar cutting to the edges. Made circa. 1790.

A lovely decanter, and at the date I have given, the feathered neck rings and disc stopper as earlier features and the prussian shape as a new feature. This would be a relatively difficult set of features to find together.

Height: 7.5 inches, without stopper.

Width: 3 inches

This is a tapered shaped decanter. The base is cut with fine horizontal flutes and has panel cut shoulders. The panel cuttingfrom the neck has taken up the with breaks in it to create three faux neck rings. The mushroom stopper has a ball in the neck and radial grooves cut into the top of it. Made circa. 1800.

I have attributed an earlier date to this than the decanter above on the basis that tapered decanters when into and out of fashion sooner than shouldered ones. Although this is bordering away from tapered towards being a shouldered decanter, I would say this is a much more elegant than the standard shouldered shape. I have read that the ball in the next of the stopper can be attributed to Irish Waterford decanters, but I am less sure of that.

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a shouldered shaped decanter with three neck rings. It also has a disc stopper with cut faces and edges. Made circa. 1800

This is a simple, well made but light weight decanter. The stopper appears to be original and this type tendered to be more late 18th century, so I suspect the date I have given of 1800 may be conservative.

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 45

Height: 9.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter banded with a rustically etched vine and grape motif and three neck rings. It also has a flute molded mushroom stopper with a ball in the neck. Made circa. 1800

This is a simply made decanter with the only cutting being for the polished pontil mark. There is a possibility that this is a Northern European decanter.

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 44

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a shouldered shaped decanter. The base is cut with fine horizontal flutes and has panel cut shoulders. The neck has three applied neck rings. It also has a cut bullseye stopper. Made circa. 1800.

Superficially this decanter is similar to one of the decanters above that has a mushroom stopper instead of the cut bullseye as this one does. If you look though you will notice that the shape and proportion of the lip of the decanter is different and goes better this this stopper.

Height: 10.5 inches, without stopper.

Width: 4 inches

This is a shouldered shaped decanter. The base is cut with fine horizontal flutes and has panel cut shoulders. The neck has three applied neck rings. The mushroom stopper has radial grooves cut into the top of it. Made circa. 1810.

This might be considered a very typical decanter of this period. All of the features in this decanter had been around for at least a couple of decades by 1810 and this could be earlier but I am trying not to be too generous. This shape is generally considered to be 1800 plus though. If you are going to collect decanters I would consider this a signature piece of the period.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a barrel shaped decanter with no cutting and two neck rings and two pulley rings around the body. It also has a cut bullseye stopper. Made Circa 1810.

Georgian period decanters with pulley rings are quite rare but were reproduced in the 1900-40 period. Neither of the ones I own have that sparkling quality that most Georgian reproductions of that period have, so I am hoping they are genuine article.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, Page 211

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 56

Height: 8.75 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with a flute molded base and three neck rings. It also has a flute molded mushroom stopper that is in keeping with the molding on the base. Made circa. 1810-20

This is a simply and quite heavily made decanter and I suspect it is from Northern Europe.

Height: 9 inches, without stopper.

Width: 4 inches

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