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POST-1800 GEORGIAN DECANTERS

The decanters in this section are dated from 1800 to about 1815. These dates are not exact but estimates on my part based on what I have seen in many references. Records from this period are incomplete and also some designs ran on for many years beyond there initial appearance.

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Decanters

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Description, References and Size

This is a tapered shaped decanter. The base is cut with fine horizontal flutes and has panel cut shoulders. The panel cuttingfrom the neck has taken up the with breaks in it to create three faux neck rings. The mushroom stopper has a ball in the neck and radial grooves cut into the top of it. Made circa. 1800.

I have attributed an earlier date to this than the decanter above on the basis that tapered decanters when into and out of fashion sooner than shouldered ones. Although this is bordering away from tapered towards being a shouldered decanter, I would say this is a much more elegant than the standard shouldered shape. I have read that the ball in the next of the stopper can be attributed to Irish Waterford decanters, but I am less sure of that.

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter banded with a rustically engraved vine and grape motif and three neck rings. It also has a flute molded mushroom stopper with a ball in the neck. Made circa. 1800

This is a simply made decanter with the only cutting being for the polished pontil mark. There is a possibility that this is a Northern European decanter.

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 44

Reference: Decanters and Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 84

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a shouldered shaped decanter. The base is cut with fine horizontal flutes and has panel cut shoulders. The neck has three applied neck rings. It also has a cut bullseye stopper. Made circa. 1800.

Superficially this decanter is similar to one of the decanters above that has a mushroom stopper instead of the cut bullseye as this one does. If you look though you will notice that the shape and proportion of the lip of the decanter is different and goes better this this stopper.

You will notice this decanters is quite cloudy, this is damage to the inside surface of the decanter. No amount of cleaning will fix this, and the way to remove it is to get it professionally polished out. If you use this decanter, filling it with liquid will make the cloudiness disappear. I could have improved this photo by filling the decanter with water, then tipping it out, and taking the picture with the decanter still wet. Herein lies a tale of caution, look out for decanters that are still wet inside when purchasing, it could be masking this damage.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 166

Reference: Collecting Glass, Norman Webber, Page 116

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a shouldered shaped decanter. The base is cut with fine horizontal flutes and has panel cut shoulders. The neck has three applied neck rings. The mushroom stopper has radial grooves cut into the top of it. Made circa. 1810.

This might be considered a very typical decanter of this period. All of the features in this decanter had been around for at least a couple of decades by 1810 and this could be earlier but I am trying not to be too generous. This shape is generally considered to be 1800 plus though. If you are going to collect decanters I would consider this a signature piece of the period.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 167

Reference: The Book of Wine Antiques, Robin Butler & Gillian Walkling, Page 138

Reference: Great British Wine Accessories, Robin Butler, plate 138

Reference: Collecting Glass, Norman Webber, Page 116

Reference: English Scottish & Irish Table Glass, G Bernard Hughes, page 303

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a shoulded decanter with intermitant flute cutting to the base, a cut frieze to the body, panel cut shoulders and three neck rings. It also has a knopped radially cut stopper that is cut flat as the apex. Made circa. 1810

This decanter is a minor variation on the decanter above. I considered not including here as being too similar, but I thought I should to show these decanters are not an entirely fixed pattern, but were made over a while by a lot of different manufacturers.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 167

Reference: The Book of Wine Antiques, Robin Butler & Gillian Walkling, Page 138

Reference: Great British Wine Accessories, Robin Butler, plate 138

Reference: Collecting Glass, Norman Webber, Page 116

Reference: English Scottish & Irish Table Glass, G Bernard Hughes, page 303

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with intermitant flute cutting to the base, a cut frieze to the body, panel cut shoulders and three neck rings. It also has a knopped radially cut stopper that is cut flat as the apex. Made circa. 1810

Shoulded decanters have sloped shoulders merging into a cylindrical body and Prussian decanters have more rounded bodies where the sloped shoulders but the base then slopes inwards. I have tried to show this transition here, as the one above is shuoldered and I have described this one as Prussian although the difference between them is quite subtle. Others might not agree with my point of transition.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 167

Reference: The Book of Wine Antiques, Robin Butler & Gillian Walkling, Page 138

Reference: Great British Wine Accessories, Robin Butler, plate 138

Reference: Collecting Glass, Norman Webber, Page 116

Reference: English Scottish & Irish Table Glass, G Bernard Hughes, page 303

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with intermitant flute cutting to the base, a cut frieze to the body, panel cut shoulders and three neck rings. It also has a knopped radially cut stopper that is cut flat as the apex. Made circa. 1810

I don't have an exact reference match for this as it is more of a type. By this I mean these Prussian decanters with three neck rings and various cut patterns around the body.

Reference: The Decanter An Illustrated History of Glass from 1650, Andy McConnell, page 209

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Anglo-Irish Prussian shaped decanter with flute cut base, a cut frieze with fine hobnails, large stars around the body, panel cut shoulders and three annulated neck rings. It has a cut bullseye stopper. Made circa. 1810

I am describing this decanter as Anglo-Irish because of slightly more chunky shape, the swags that enclose a field of fine hobnails, and the annulated neck rings. It's the combination of features and not the features individually.

Reference: The Decanter An Illustrated History of Glass from 1650, Andy McConnell, page 209

Reference: English Scottish & Irish Table Glass, G Bernard Hughes, page 303

Height: 11 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with intermitant flute cutting to the base, a cut frieze to the body, panel cut shoulders and three neck rings. It also has a knopped radially cut stopper that is cut flat as the apex. Made circa. 1810

This is a standard shouldered decanter of the time with a bit extra. From what I have seen of the way things were advertised back then, you would get basic shapes and then for increasing amounts of money they would add fancy bits. With the frieze and fancier stopper this clearly has some added fancy bits.

If I were to be cruel, I don't think this frieze is a good design. It seems a bit of a hodge-podge of elements that don't go together. It doesn't say wow look at the cutting, it says funny design with triangles and circles.

Reference: The Decanter An Illustrated History of Glass from 1650, Andy McConnell, page 209

Reference: English Scottish & Irish Table Glass, G Bernard Hughes, page 303

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with a panel cut base, a cut frieze of diamonds with stars in to the body, panel cut shoulders and three neck rings. It also has a radially cut stopper. Made circa. 1810

In general the panel cut base indicates a later date, however, the overall decanter seems earlier so I am keeping this one in this time preriod.

Reference: The Decanter An Illustrated History of Glass from 1650, Andy McConnell, page 209

Reference: English Scottish & Irish Table Glass, G Bernard Hughes, page 303

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

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