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20TH CENTURY TUMBLERS

Nobody expects the Spanish inquisition and nobody collects 20th century tumblers. Not even me, I just happen to have acquired a few over the years, and seeing them in combination like this makes me think of them a little differently and wonder why no one is collecting them.

The thing about tumblers is that they very practical and thus are on the rapid road to destruction. I have noticed that as you go back in time the numbers you can find drop off quite rapidly and I think it is because they are not for special occasions they are for everyday use.

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Tumblers

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Description, References and Size

This is a tumbler glass with a wrythen body and four dimples. The tumbler is in the John Walsh Walsh catalogue listed as, "The Venetian Suite". Made circa.1900-1930.

Made of super thin glass this tumbler is lucky to have survived or only been used for best. Design wise this is from the end of era of fine Victorian glasses that made in this kind of style.

This tumbler came as a part of a job lot with stemmed glasses, jugs, carafes etc.. If you go to the John Walsh Walsh section you can see some of them.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 32.

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 52.

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Whitefriars footed tumbler with a shallow cut hexagon pattern bisected by thin cut grooves. This is Whitefriars pattern number 8000. Designed by Harry Powell in 1906 and produced until the 1930s.

This glass is a part of a suit of glasses designed by Harry Powell and to go with it are glasses of various sizes, finger bowls, decanters and I expect others. So if you like this one, don't fixate on this size/shape of glass look out for this cutting in different patterns.

The hexagon pattern itself was copied from a Roman glass bowl that was excavated in Germany.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 77 & 289

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 43 & 103

Height: 4 inches

Width: 1.5 inches

This is a "gold amber" Whitefriars M3 pattern tumbler, slightly waisted to the lower part, with no pontil. Designed by William Wilson in 1933.

This glass is as thin as egg shell, which means it was incredibly cheap because they used hardly any glass or incredibly expensive as it was so difficult to make. It's a minimalist design in that there is hardly an design.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 130

Reference: Whitefriars 1938 catalogue on the Whitefriars.com website.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M60 pattern shot glass with a solid base. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1935.

There is a M60 decanter to go with this, if you look in the Whitefriars Decanter section. The modern world arrives, if you popped into IKEA and bought a box with a dozen of these in you wouldn't think they were designed over 80 years ago. These are such a simple design, but keeping modernity after so long, that is where the gods of design live.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a "Sea Green" Whitefriars M60 pattern shot glass with a solid base. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1935.

The same as above but in a different colour. "Sea Green" and "Gold Amber" are the most common Whitefriars colours as this time.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Webb Corbett tumbler with three upward pointing stylised elongated wheat-ears patterns traversing four horizontal wavy grooves. It has an etched makers mark, WEBB CORBETT MADE IN ENGLAND that was used from 1930-1947.

This lovely quality tumbler was probably designed by Herbert Webb circa. 1935.

All of this Webb Corbett glass with wavy lines is screams English art deco, and I would buy where you see, as it doesn't get much cooler than this. The other thing is, I don't think anyone else was using this motif either.

Reference: British Glass Between the Wars, Roger Dodsworth, page 100

Reference: Art Deco to Post Moderism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, page 24

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal Ellesmere rounded tumbler, cut with stylised leaf patterns to the base and surmounts by fern patterns. Marked Stuart ENGLAND. Designed by Lugwig Kny in the 1930s Made c.1930-70s.

Ellesmere is such a lovely pattern I can understand why it was made for so long. I expect it was expensive buy new, and it still maintains a premium for anyone wishing to build a service today.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 239

Reference: Stuart Crystal Catalogue 1930s

Reference: Art Deco to Post Moderism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, page 14

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal Ellesmere straight sided tumbler, cut with stylised leaf patterns to the base, surmounted by fern patterns. Marked Stuart ENGLAND. Designed by Lugwig Kny in the 1930s Made c.1930-70s.

The thing to remember about Stuart Crystal is that they were making glass for the English middle class, and as such you needed to be able to show off. In terms of glassware this means you need a glass for everything. The table needs to be laden with sparklyness. The small slight variation in these two tumblers shows you the direction of travel where diners might have 4 or 5 different glasses depending on what course they were eating and what needed to be drunk with course. What is ironic about it is that when this kind of dining was popular, in general, the cuisine was terrible. I think cuisine is better than it used to be, but wine is drunk straight from bottle to wine glass, and no one worried what kind of glass it is, a glass is a glass.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 239

Reference: Stuart Crystal Catalogue 1930s

Reference: Art Deco to Post Moderism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 14

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 3 inches

This sky blue Stuart Crystal tumbler is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

This is a design classic that was made from 1921 to the 1970s. Go the Stuart Crystal section in Glass by Maker to other shapes and colours for this base pattern.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a Webb "Ribbonette" pattern tumbler in khaki green. Pattern number 33130, made c.1910-28.

These glasses also come in brown, sky blue, uranium green, and orange. The latter three coloured glasses have heavier bases and just look newer. They might be 1930s.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles Hajdamach, page 54 and 533.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a Webb "Ribbonette" pattern tumbler in uranium orange. Pattern number 33130, made c.1910-28.

You can see this uranium orange version is heavier and also the chevron pattern is less distinct on it. It would be great to see some better reference material on this pattern as you see a lot of it about.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles Hajdamach, page 54 and 533.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is an amber spirit tumbler probably by Thomas Webb and Co. It is unmarked and has a polished base. Probably made c.1930s or 40s.

This glass is one of a set of six made to go with the similar decanter in the Thomas Webb Decanter section. I know of 2 other sets of these so it really does go with the decanter in the other section. These are not Whitefriars as if you look at similar tumblers like the M60, they do not have polished pontil marks, and many of the Whitefriars glasses at this period appear not to have them.

I would like to thank Wolfie at www.whitefriars.com for this attribution. He is not certain, but I am happy to go with it until someone shows me something concrete.

Height: 2.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a rib moulded "Straw" short tumbler, with a solid footed base. Described in the Elfverson catalogue as Cocktail Hakon. Made by Strombergshyttan in Sweden, and designed in the 1930s possibly by Hugh Dunne Cooke.

This is one of the glasses that came with the E.624 decanter. In the reference I have the glasses portrayed with the E.624 are stemmed and these glasses are on the next page, however they are the same colour, and have a similar moulded rib pattern, so I am happy that these were most likely originally purchased together.

Please look to the Strombershyttan section in Glass by Maker to find out more about this company and the named designer.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 60

Height: 2.5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a small lobed "Straw" whiskey tumbler. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Made by Strombergshyttan in Sweden, and designed in the 1930s possibly by Hugh Dunne Cooke.

This tumbler goes with the "Straw" Osborne decanter from the Strombergshyttan Decanter section. For such small glasses they are surprisingly solid.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a lobed "Elfverson Blue" whiskey tumbler with a gilt rim. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Made by Strombergshyttan in Sweden, and designed in the 1930s possibly by Hugh Dunne Cooke.

The previous two Osborne tumblers are quite small. Just about big enough for a whiskey with a cube of ice. This tumbler is much bigger and really heavy, more of a gin and tonic size. As I have already mentioned I do use these glasses and they are great to use if you are man. My wife doesn't like them as they are too big and heavy for her hands. This colour is the best as it has beautiful refractive qualities.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

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