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GEORGIAN BUCKET BOWL GLASSES

Bucket bowl glasses were not particularly common, so you are going to see that I don't have lot of them. This means that either they weren't particularly fashionable or that they broke more easily.

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Tableware

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Description, References and Size

This is a bucket bowled wine glass with a fine engraving of the Prince of Wales feathers and motto. Made circa early 19th century.

I have seen other versions of this glass with more cutting, so I think this is at the bottom of the scale for these Prince of Wales type of glasses. That being the case it is still a very fine glass with high quality engraving.

You will notice that the foot has a small chip in it, because of this and because I don't think the seller realised it is a real Regency glass, it was only 3 in an antiques centre. If you don't mind the odd chip early glasses can be really cheap. The way I see it, it is very likely that most of these period glasses have been chipped, but that someone has gone to the trouble of having those chips polished out. If you see an early glass that has chips, it is more likely that the shape and proportions of the glass you are looking are the original ones and not a cut down version. This is only my opinion though.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 183

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is an Irish bucket bowled wine glass with a faceted stem, flute cut to the base of the bowl, and a band of vesica cutting with etched glass in between the pattern. Made circa early 19th century.

Over the years I have managed to pick up a decanter and tumbler to go with this glass. I have to say, for the hundreds of early decanters I have it is not often that you will see a glass or any other tableware that you can point to and say these are from the same service.

Please check the Irish Glass, Cut Glass Decanters to see the decanter that goes with this glass.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 183

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a bucket bowled port/sherry glass with an everted lip, and crudely etched with grape vines. The stem has baluster and ball knops, it also has a folded foot. Made circa late 18th Century.

I suspect these little glasses were churned out by the tens of thousands, but because these are close to the bottom end of the market I expect they were also broken at similar rate. These types of glasses can be found wherever antique glasses are for sale, but look out for the ones with a folded foot, as this is something that stopped in the early 19th Century and makes it most likely that the glass no matter how poorly made is an 18th Century one.

This glass is made of lead glass, be aware that there are a lot of soda glass glasses with this same pattern that were imported from the continent, these are of even more inferior quality. You can tell the difference by pinging the rim of the glass with your finger nail. If it rings, it's lead glass, if it's more a clunk then it's soda glass. You can try this with your glasses at home.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 183

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a bucket bowled port/sherry glass and crudely etched with swaged garlands and bows. The stem has baluster and bladed knops, it also has a folded foot. Made circa late 18th century.

This glass is a step up from the glass above. The overall quality is better and you can see that more time has been spent on the etching. These glasses are not as common as the ones with grapes etched on them but you will see them if you are out looking for antique glasses.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 183

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a bucket bowled port/sherry glass and crudely etched with swaged garlands and bows. The stem has baluster and bladed knops, it also has a folded foot. Made circa late 18th century.

You may be wondering why I am showing two glasses that look the same, there is quite a big technical difference between this glass and the one above. The one above was made in two parts with the stem and bowl being one piece of glass and the foot being joined to it whilst the glass is still hot. This glass was made in 3 pieces, with the stem being joined to the bowl and the foot then being joined to the stem. By looking carefully and using your finger nails you can see and feel the seams. In general 3 part glasses are thought to be better than two part, however, you need to be a bit of a nerd to consider such things above the overall aesthetic of the glass.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 183

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

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