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CUSTARD GLASSES

Custard glasses are small short glasses with handles, sometimes with a stem and sometimes without, that are used for serving a small pudding like custard. I know from experience that the handles are incredibly delicate, so that the ones you do see are often survivors from the crowd.

They are not the best documented glass but were made from the 18th century to well into the 20th century. Their low cost and great variety makes them great to collect.

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Glasses

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Description, References and Size

This is a John Walsh Walsh custard cup with a wrythen bowl with fours dimples, on a slim stem. Made circa.1900-1930.

This glass is not in the Eric Reynolds book, The Glass of John Walsh Walsh, but comparing with the other glasses in this suite it is clearly from the same stable. I really like the touch with the old school Georgian style handles with the piggy tails.

It is worth noting that the handle is out of period for when it was made. This type of handle is usually considered to be pre-1850s, but in this case I believe this glass is 20th century, and is definitely past the date when jug handles were made from top to bottom as this one is. I have noticed that custard glasses frequently break this period dating convention.

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Langbridge, chapter 1902

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a Whitefriars "Poppy Head" rib moulded custard glass with four dents in bowl and an everted rim. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1890s.

I have been led to believe this rib moulded poppy head service is quite rare and that no one knew they did custard glasses too. I wasn't even sure this was Whitefriars, I just thought it might be and it's only 3. This is a lesson in not just knowing every pattern but knowing the kind of thing companies make as not everything is in the books.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 104

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 75

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a Thomas Webb "Fircone" moulded custard glass with an everted rim. Made circa.1903-40.

I don't have any book references for this glass, but is does have the Fircone moulding and the handle has a certain fatness about it that other Thomas Webb jugs of this period have.

Some of these glasses don't look straight and that is because they aren't.

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a petal moulded custard glass with a rudimentary stem and the handle having a piggy tail end. Made circa early 19th century.

Whilst this is not definite, this is probably the earliest of the custard glasses I own. The more conical stem implies it is closer to 18th century glasses.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 20

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a petal moulded custard glass with an everted lip, with the capstan stem having a bladed knop and the handle having a piggy tail end. Made circa early 19th century.

I have reords of this kind of stem from 1811, it might be earlier but I believe this type was relatively new in the 19th century as it doesn't appear in any of my 18th century glass reference books.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 20

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a bucket bowl panel cut custard glass with a cut faceted base and the handle having a piggy tail end. Made circa early 19th century.

Whilst being the least glamorous of the custard glasses I own, this one demonstrates how cheap they can as I think it was only 4 from an antiques centre. In general they tend to be under 10, as I don't believe people particularly collect them and they are not really a practical item.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 53

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

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