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GEORGIAN FACET STEM GLASSES

A fashion for making facet stemed glasses started from about 1780. The glasses were the usual shapes from the earlier fashion of opaque and air twist stems but just with facets cut into the stems.

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Glasses

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Description, References and Size

This is a wine glass with a hexagonal facet cut stem, a funnel bowl with an egg and dart frieze and conical foot. Made circa 1785.

This is an elegant glass and feels like something a person of quality would use. To give you an idea of what I mean by quality, there are about 65 egg and darts making up the frieze, and each one is made of 5 cuts, which means it would have taken about 325 cuts to make this simple frieze. Looks simple, but isn't.

Glasses with these drawn stem and funnel bowls don't seem that well documented.

Reference: The Price Guide to English 18th Century Drinking Glasses, Turnbull & Herron, Page 276

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a wine glass with a diamond facet cut stem and a funnel bowl with a frieze of engraved olives and conical foot. Made circa 1785.

The engraving on this glass is the least of the engraved glasses here and this job would have been done within a couple of minutes. All of the other glasses with friezes would taken at least ten times as long to do and the ones which also include an element of polishing, even longer. It seems a little strange that the effort to create the faceted stem would be followed by such a quick engraving job.

Reference: The Price Guide to English 18th Century Drinking Glasses, Turnbull & Herron, Page 279

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 242

Reference: English Glass, Sidney Compton, plate 137

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a wine glass with a diamond facet cut stem, a funnel bowl and conical foot. Made circa 1785.

I have described this glass has having a funnel bowl but the bowl does have a slight curve and it heading towards ovoid or ogee. Unfortunately this shape does not have it's own name so I am stick with funnel because not round enough to be ovoid.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 242

Reference: The Price Guide to English 18th Century Drinking Glasses, Turnbull & Herron, Page 284

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a wine glass with a diamond facet cut stem, a funnel bowl and conical foot. Made circa 1785.

This glass is a kind of classic type, but like the one above is very plain and the kind of this type that you are most likely to find flying under the radar and pick up cheap. Also, although it looks similar to the one above is bigger and probably double the weight.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 242

Reference: The Price Guide to English 18th Century Drinking Glasses, Turnbull & Herron, Page 284/p>

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is an ale glass with a tall funnel bowl sitting on a hexagonal faceted stem and conical foot. The top of the bowl has an XOX frieze and the stem has hexagonal facets. Made circa 1785.

This glass is a classic old time collectors piece, not as sought after as cotton twist stem glasses but still collectable 18th century pieces.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 242

Reference: Phaidon Guide to Glass, Felice Mehlman, page 96

Reference: Early English Glass, D. Wilmer, page 101

Reference: The Price Guide to English 18th Century Drinking Glasses, Turnbull & Herron, Page 277

Reference: English Glass, Sidney Compton, plate 136

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is an ale glass with a tall ogee bowl sitting on a diamond faceted stem and conical foot. The top of the bowl has an XOX frieze and the stem has diamond facets. Made circa 1785.

This glass appears to be almost the same as the one above the close details are different. The cut facets are a different shape, the cut olives in the XOX frieze are horizontally aligned and not vertical as above, it has less faceting on the bowl and the foot is wider, and of course the bowl shape is different.

This glass has the classic wide foot 18th century drinking glass feature of having a wider foot than bowl. The foot is about an inch wider, but does have a nibble in it.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 242

Reference: Phaidon Guide to Glass, Felice Mehlman, page 96

Reference: English Table Glass, Percy Bate, page 54

Reference: The Price Guide to English 18th Century Drinking Glasses, Turnbull & Herron, Page 278

Reference: Collecting Glass, Norman Webber, page 83

Reference: The Arthur Negus Guide to British Glass, John Brooks page 109

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a bucket bowled wine glass with a slice cut stem, flute cut to the base of the bowl, and a band of vesica and diamond cutting with frosted glass in between the pattern. Made c.1810

Possibly made at the Cork or Waterloo glass houses due to them favouring the vesica pattern.

By lucky happenstance this glass goes with one of my Irish decanters. Ho hum, only five more to find to make a set.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a wine glass with a slice cut stem and engraved with a frieze of ragged penants surrmounted by olives. Made circa 1800.

This wine glass is a bit like a tall dram glass. The engraving is simple but was probably time consuming to do, and polishing the centre of each of the olives is an added touch.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 246

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a wine glass with a slice cut stem, a drawn funnel bowl, and engraved with an egg and dart frieze. Made circa 1800.

This glass is like the first glass on this page but I believe the slice cut stems are a bit later and also carried on being used into the early 19th century.

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

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