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EARLY JELLY GLASSES

Jelly glasses were made for over 100 years and were used for little puddings of jelly or syllabub or custard to be eaten with a spoon. They normally have a slim bowl with an everted lip and a short or no stem. As they were made over such a long period of time there are lots of variations. The ones that are only a couple of hundred years old tend to be cheaper and they only start becoming more expensive once you get back into the early 1700s.

I think jelly glasses are quite cool as they were thing for quite a long time, they went out of fashion and people now don't know what they are. 200 years ago, anyone with any kind of refinement would have know what they were.

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Glasses

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Description, References and Size

This is a jelly glass with a straight sided tall hexagonal bowl, a cushion knop, a domed foot with a broken pontil. Made circa mid 18th century.

This is a classic old school collectors piece and is not very common. There are slight variations on these, but I think mine is particularly nice because of the domed foot and cushion knop, but I would say that.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 49

Reference: Glass, E. Barrington Haynes, Plate 62

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, cushion knop, diamond moulded bowl, and with a broken pontil. Made circa mid 18th century.

This is another classic old school collectors piece, although to make it really desirable it really needed a domed foot. When glasses have a domed foot like the one above and you are saying it's mid 18th century, it's more likely to pre-1750 than post-1750. You can say this definitively but that is my view from the dozens of books on this subject. I haven't done any sort of mathematical analysis of this, it's just how it seems to me.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, cushion knop, and with a broken pontil. Made circa mid to late 18th century.

If you are a bit of a bottom feeder collector like me, trying to pick out things from unexpected places that no one else has noticed, this is one of the more common 18th century glasses you are going to find. They don't look like anything special and people think they are vases. It's your chance to snap up a really old piece of glass for a couple of pounds.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 13

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, and with a broken pontil. Made circa mid to late 18th century.

This is very similar to the glass above only it doesn't have the cushion knop, again it's very vase like. The simple ones like this tend to have broken pontil, so if you see one, turn it over and check for the scruffy bit of glass in the middle of the foot. The other thing about them is that they are all lead glass, and being the shape they are, if you ping it with your finger nail it should ring like a bell.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 13

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, vertical ribs, and with a polished pontil. Made circa late 18th century.

This the first of three jellies in sequence with each one building with more cutting on the previous one. When people were purchasing this kind of tableware they would be buying half a dozen, a dozen or dozens. They would also be offered options of varying prices, where more embellishments would be added to a standard, each costing a little more. If it's anything like today, I suspect a lot of people would be in an arms race to have the best or better on their table than those considered their peers. We don't do dinner parties these days, but iPhone users still look down on Android phone users.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 15

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: English and Irish Glass, Geoffrey Wills, Part 2 Page 4

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, vertical ribs cut with notches, and with a polished pontil. Made circa late 18th century.

As you can see this is pretty much the same as the previous glass but in this case each of the vertical ribs has little notches cut into it.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 15

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: English and Irish Glass, Geoffrey Wills, Part 2 Page 4

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, the lip being cut with wavy serrations, vertical ribs cut with notches, and with a polished pontil. Made circa late 18th century.

Again, the same as previous but with the cut wavy lip. Personally I think this is now over embellishment, even to the point where I considered not buying this glass even though it was cheap.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: English and Irish Glass, Geoffrey Wills, Part 2 Page 4

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, which is panel cut, and with a polished pontil. Made circa early 19th century.

This is a similar plan to the earlier glasses but with the innovation of panel cutting which more of an 19th century thing.

I previously mentioned that these are often sold as small vases and as you can see from the marking in the bowl, this one has been used as a vase.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, which is panel cut, notches cut to the other edge of the rim, slices cut from the top edge of the foot, and with a polished pontil. Made circa early 19th century.

This glass is a progression of the previous glass in that it is virtually the same glass but with added cutting to the rim and foot, probably costing another shilling a dozen or some such.

Also of interest in this glass are the big chunks of frit that are plainly visible. Frit is unmelted sand or bits from the wall of the kiln that have got into the glass. If you look minutely at it most glass from this period will have bits of frit and bubbles and soot somewhere in them. It's another of those, is it old indicators.

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 253

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, which is flat cut diamonds surmounted by flat cut vesica, a Monteith cut rim, a hexagonal cut foot, and with a polished pontil. Made circa late 18th century.

This is a very collectable jelly glass and when it was made would have been quite expensive. It is cut all over and at the time it was done the cutting wheel would have been powered by a foot treadle, so although the cutting is flat it would have been laborious work to produce one of these.

As I mentioned these glasses are frequently mistaken for small vases. This is one of a pair I bought at an antiques centre for 7 labelled as posy vases. If I was starting collecting again, something like jelly glasses would be a good place to start because they are out there and they can be very cheap.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 51

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with an everted lip bowl, which is panel cut, and with a polished pontil. Made circa early 19th century.

This is either a short jelly glass of a custard cup without a handle. No reference exactly says which so I am going with jelly glass.

Reference: Sweetmeat and Jelly Glasses, Therle Hughes, Page 51

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, a short pillar stem, and an octagonal press moulded lemon squeezer base. Made circa 1800.

This is another rare form of jelly glass, lemon squeezer bases are rare but they are usually square, I haven't seen an octagonal one apart in the book I am referencing. It's not a cut down square base as it would be not proportionate if you added corners back on.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a jelly glass with a tall everted lip bowl, a short stem with a bladed knop, and with a polished pontil. Made circa early 19th century.

This is just like the more common wine glasses of the period but with a longer bowl with an everted lip. If it didn't have an everted lip it would be an ale glass.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, Page 181

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

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