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RUMMERS

Rummers are practical glasses with large bowls and short stems that were originally designed for hot toddys. In case you are wondering; "what's a hot toddy?", it's a spirit mixed with water and flavourings. The classic English toddy being Rum, water, sugar and nutmeg.

The use of the word rummer was first recorded in 1788, and glasses were used as rummers until well into Victorian times. The later glasses I see called rummers are usually heavy pub type (not of high quality) glasses.

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Rummers

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Description, References and Size

This is a rummer with an ogee bowl and pillar stem, made circa. 1810.

This example is kind of what is considered the classic rummer, and if you are going to collect them this is one to have in your collection as the definitive example of the type. Or at least it is to my mind.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 9, page 11

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an ogee bowl and pillar stem, made circa. 1810.

This rummer is very similar to the one above but is much more robust with thick walls which might notice provide some optical effect. It is not usual for them to be this heavy.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 9, page 11

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an incurved bowl and pillar stem. The bowl is engraved with hops and barley. Made circa. 1810.

This rummer is a subtly different shape to the two above, with those ones the bowl shape goes out, curves in the middle and goes then up and this is called ogee. The bowl on this is one smooth curve from top to bottom. Some ogee shapes can be more pronounced than those above and you have to make your own judgement call on when something is incurved or ogee.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 9, page 11

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an cup bowl and pillar stem. The bowl is engraved with a frieze made up of jagged triangles and olives. Made circa. 1800.

Cup bowl rummers are less common that ogee and incurved bowl rummers, and they are sometimes called u-bowl rummers for obvious reasons. The frieze on this rummer is a classic of the period and I have very similar friezes on other glasses of the period, but I have not seen this frieze on any decanters.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Masonic rummer with an incurved bowl, pillar stem, and square lemon squeeze foot. The bowl is engraved and cut with a large cartouche with initials and has various Masonic symbols. Made circa. 1800.

This rummer is the business and is about as good as it gets, it does have a hefty chunk out of the base which is why it only cost me 5. It was literally sitting in a cardboard box of rubbish glass outside an antiques shop and I suspect it was getting closer to the bin. That's why it had to come home with me.

Whoever owned it clearly fancied themselves as something as the cartouche with initials is pretty big for this glass. I believe the initials are JV, but I'm not certain. You can see the Masonic symbol hanging below.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 260

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 9, page 20

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Masonic rummer with an incurved bowl, pillar stem, and square lemon squeeze foot. The bowl is engraved and cut with a large cartouche with initials and has various Masonic symbols. Made circa. 1800.

I am showing both sides of this rummer so that you can some of the weird masonic symbols it has on it, such a ladder with an eye and a book on it going up a cloud, etc.. Masons are not a secret society, but a society with secrets, i.e. you can know who is a Mason, but you can't know their ceremonies, hence I don't know what the symbols mean.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 260

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 9, page 20

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an incurved bowl, pillar stem, and square lemon squeeze foot. Made circa. 1800.

Supposedly rummers were used for making rum toddies, which is rum, lemon, water, and sugar. At the time sugar came in a solid block. Pieces would be broken off put into the drink, where dissolving would be further assisted with the use of a sugar crusher. Sugar crushers are like a miniature pestle. The reason I am mentioning this is because you often see a lot of scratches in the bottom of rummers and these are supposed to be caused by the use of sugar crushers being used to break up sugar in the bottom of the glass. This a story a dealer told me a long time ago, whether or not it is totally true.... Sugar certainly did come in big solid blocks though. The reason I am telling you this with this glass, is because it has scratches in the bottom.

Reference: Rummers and Goblets, Stephen Parry, page 10

Reference: Eighteenth Century Drinking Glasses, L.M. Bickerton, Page 260

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 9, page 20

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an ogee bowl and pillar stem and a frieze of engraved barley below the rim. Made circa. early 20th century.

This rummer is on the end here because it is by far the newest of them by a large margin. It looks like the older ones and that is because it is a copy. I am not saying it's a fake, as it is far too well made to be considered as such, but glass like this can fool the unwary.

The frieze pattern is great, and this is also what marks it out as a copy. The design is so together, it doesn't look like something knocked up by a craftsman, it looks like it came out of the design room of a factory, and doesn't feel period.

I don't know who made this and it's not in any books, and a number of companies were making rummer type goblets at this time. The general quality of the manufacture and surface wear and tear leads me to believe it has some age, but not 200 plus years. Also look at how neatly the foot and stem are joined compared to all the other glasses here. Also the book I have referenced here shows that reproductions were made at this time.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a bucket bowl rummer with bladed knop stem. Made circa. early 20th century.

In my reference books you see a lot of fancy engraved bucket bowl rummers. Engravers may have liked bucket bowl rummers for their large working surface, but they are rarer than the reference books suggest. If you find any bucket bowl rummers engraved or not, it's a good find.

Also, this is a dying bucket bowl rummer. You can see the bowl has a shimmery effect on it, this is known as "crizzling" or "glass sickness", and it means the glass is turning into sand. Glass is actually a very slow moving liquid, and if you get the chemistry wrong it turns back into sand. That is what is happening to this glass. It's taken 200 hundred years to get this far, but that is what it is doing.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an U-shaped bowl and drawn stem. Made circa. late 19th/early 20th century.

This is the kind of heavy duty all purpose pub glass that being made at this time. You will see them listed as rummers and I am sticking with that naming convention, even though I suspect they are not used in the same way as the earlier glasses listed here.

You will see a lot of variations on these glasses, this more of the taller slimmer variety but you will see shorter squatter ones. If you are looking to collect some of these, don't be impatient as they are relatively common and you should be able to get them quite cheaply.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rummer with an ogee bowl and pillar stem and a frieze of engraved barley below the rim. Made circa. early 20th century.

This rummer is on the end here because it is by far the newest of them. It looks like the older ones and that is because it is a copy. I am not saying it's a fake, as it is far too well made to be considered as such, but glass like this can fool the unwary.

The frieze pattern is great, and this is also what marks it out as a copy. The design is so together, it doesn't look like something knocked up by a craftsman, it looks like it came out of the design room of a factory, and doesn't feel period.

I don't know who made this and it's not in any books, and a number of companies were making rummer type goblets at this time. The general quality of the manufacture and surface wear and tear leads me to believe it has some age, but not 200 plus years. Also look at how neatly the foot and stem are joined compared to all the other glasses here. Also the book I have referenced here shows that reproductions were made at this time.

Reference: Hallmarks of Antique Glass, R. Wilkinson, page 64

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

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