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CREAM JUGS

Cream jugs now only seem to be be a thing if you go to restaurant or cafe, and they don't even have cream in them anyway. In these health conscious days it is for milk to put in your coffee or tea. The other thing you will notice is that they are either stoneware or metal in order for them to survive hundreds of goes in a dishwasher. Little glass jugs like these are from a bygone age.

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Jugs

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Description, References and Size

This an early Georgian waisted cream jug, with a ribbed body and ribbed pig tail handle. Made circa 1770.

You really can get cheap little bargains off eBay if you are diligent. This does have a small crack near where top part of the handle joins the body, but this cost next to nothing for something so historic and well made.

I knew it was old but struggled to find a reference for it until I saw the tankards in my Eighteenth Century English Drinking Glasses, and there they were, just the same but with a pouring lip pinched in.

Reference: Eighteenth Century English Drinking Glasses An Illustrated Guide, L.M. Bickerton, page 261

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This Mid-Georgian cream jug, engraved foliage and a small flying bird and ribbed pig tail handle. Made circa 1790.

Here is another small cream jug, but slightly later than the previous one.

For English jugs these pig tails where the bottom of the handle has ripples and a curled around bottom, it's the sign of a very early jug, however I do know that in the US they were making this type of jug handle well into Victorian times.

Reference: Eighteenth Century English Drinking Glasses An Illustrated Guide, L.M. Bickerton, page 261

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a neo-classical cream jug with finely engraved of foliage around the body. Made circa 1850-1870.

I am going with the above dates because all of the jugs I have seen illustrated with a gaping pouring lip formed by pinching opposite ends of the rim all seem to within this time frame.

This is my wife's jug so I would like to thank her for allowing me to include it.

Reference: British Glass 1800-1914, Charles R Hajdamach

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a cream jug that is pillar moulded that is then twisted through to horizontal as it moves up the body. Made circa 1850-1870.

I have dated this in line with Pillar moulded decanters of the period. As the handle is applied top to bottom 1870s has to be the top end of the dating.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 401

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 338

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a rib moulded cream jug. Made circa 1800-1840.

I have started with a reasonably early date for this jug as although I have reference for it, everything about it feels like it's an early piece. Sometimes these things are difficult to pin down but my instinct says it's early but not super early (if that means anything).

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a cream jug engraved with foliage around the body, birds and hearts and what is possibly a cage. Made circa 1880-1910.

The way the handle is applied bottom to top makes me put a starting date of 1880 and as this has an unpolished pontil I am going with the earliest date possible. The birds, hearst and cage(?) probably have some meaning, but I don't know what it is.

This is my wife's jug so I would like to thank her for allowing me to include it.

Reference: British Glass 1800-1914, Charles R Hajdamach

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

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