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REGENCY DECANTERS

The Regency period saw the introduction of steam powered glass cutting. Previously glass cutters had relied on treadle powered glass cutting, where cutting deep was time consuming. This section illustrates some of the new cutting techniques that come into fashion during the Regency period, such as pillar and step cutting. Both techniques were labour intensive and went out of fashion, although step cutting later appears in reproduction decanters in the early 20th Century.

Cylinder shaped decanters become more common during this period and last through until the early Victorian period. These are covered in their

For the purposes of this website I am saying the Regency period is 1815-1840, although historically this in inaccurate as it includes the William IV period.

Regency Decanters

This is a large decanter with combe cutting to the base of the body, panel cut shoulders running up the lip, with gaps in the cutting to give the appearance of four neck rings. The stopper is a cut bullseye. Made circa 1815.

This is a monster decanter and I am not sure what shape you would call it. It is not that much larger than other decanters it is just that it doesn't have a neck as such and just tapers inwards, which makes it look so much more bulky.

Sadly it has a slight nick near the top of the stopper that is visible in the picture. I have given it this date based on the mixture of Georgian and Regency features.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 257

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

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This is a Prussian shaped decanter with a vertically sliced cut body with the slices running up between the three neck rings. The neck rings are applied with the first being on the shoulder of the decanter and them all being shallower than is normal practice. It also has a solid ball vertically slice cut stopper that is in keeping with the cutting to the body and neck fo the decanter. Made circa. 1820

This is a quite heavy decanter that with the amount of cutting it has was probably quite expensive as the time of manufacture. Whilst being quite solid and practical, this type of decanter does not seem to be as sought after as many other styles of Georgian decanter and can often be bought quite cheaply. They often don't seem to have the original stopper as this one does.

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Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 262

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4 inches

Regency Decanter c.1820-30. This is a barrel shaped pillar cut decanter.

This is a Regency pillar cut barrel shaped decanter c.1820-30. It has a star cut base, with tapered pillar cut to the body, panel cut shoulders and four faux rings cut into the neck. The stopper is a solid with pillar cutting to match the body of the decanter.

Cutting and polishing the rounded shapes required for pillar cutting was time consuming and expensive, consequently this style of decanter with pillar cutting was short lived.

Height: 9.25 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Regency shaft and globe shaped decanter. It has a star cut base, shallow hobnail cut body, panel cut shoulders, three facet cut neck rings, and a ten sided pouring lip. The stopper is a solid ball cut with shallow hobnails to match the body of the decanter. Made circa 1820.

Whilst shaft and globe is a typical Victorian shape, the proportions of this are not Victorian. The shape is quite unusual for the period, but the cutting is very typical, consequently my attribution to Regency. It is quite heavy and would have cost a lot in its day.

Height: 10 inches

Width: 5.25 inches

This is a Regency shaft and globe shaped decanter. It has a star cut base, shallow hobnail cut body, panel cut shoulders, and two faux neck rings. The stopper is a hollow ball cut with shallow hobnails to match the body of the decanter, with radial cutting to the top. Made circa 1820.

I am sticking with my story that this shape of decanter is quite rare in the Regency period, as although I have two, they are actually the only two decanters with this early style cutting and this shape I have seen.

I think a cheap skate like me managed to get these two nice decanters because I don't think the sellers realised how rare and early they were.

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Regency prussian shaped decanter with vertical groove partitions cut to the body, panel cut shoulders, and two neck rings with a ring of printies cut above. The stopper is a blown mushroom with cart wheel cutting. Made circa 1830.

Aspects of this decanter were popular from the 1820s through to about 1850, so why do I consider this to be an early one. The prussian shape is one that later fell out of favour also the lack of star or cartwheel cutting to the base is also usually an earlier feature. This decanter does not appear to sit in the common pattern for its type as the cylinder decanters that looked very similar to this. These features makes me believe this is a Regency as opposed to an early Victorian decanter.

Height: 11.5 inches

Width: 5.25 inches

A set of three unusually shaped Regency spirit decanter with a radially cut base, step or prismatic cut body and swirls with hobnails cut on top on the shoulders. It also have a single neck ring and a mushroom stoppers with a swirl cut to the top. Made circa 1810-20.

These are high quality spirit decanters are made to fit into a silver or Sheffield plate stand, of the type with hoops to hold the bottles in place. These might have been made by a company called Waterhouse and Ryland, as they made decanters of this type.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, Page 200

Height: 7.75 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Regency prussian shaped decanter with blazes cut to the base of the body, flute cut shoulders and three neck rings. The stopper is a mushroom with radial cutting and a knopped stem. Made circa 1820.

The would be a classical Georgian decanter apart from the striking blazes cut to the base. The overall proportions of the decanter is similar to but later Regency models, which is why I have dated it at an intermediate date of 1820.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 247 & 251

Height: 10 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Regency prussian shaped decanter with combe cutting to the base of the body, lens and fine hobnails cut in a band around the middle, flute cut shoulders and three faceted neck rings. The stopper is a hollow mushroom with radial cutting to the top and flat cut sides. Made circa 1820.

I had a lot of doubts about whether or not this was a later copy. There is no doubting that this decanter has had a hard life, and there is all the wear and tear of a period piece. The thing that is making me fall uncomfortably in to the "it is the real thing" camp, is that it has some frit embedded in the side of the decanter. Frit is either unmelted sand or bits of soot and rubbish that has fallen in the molten glass. The older the glass the more common it is to see frit embedded in finished pieces of tableware. It also has the soapy water colour a lot of older glass has.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 247 & 251

Height: 10 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a club shaped decanter with a vertical panel cut body, prism cut neck. The mushroom stopper is facet cut. Made circa 1830.

This is a really nice quality little decanter, but I am not sure it will even hold a pint.

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a Regency prussian shaped decanter with panels cut to the base of the body, panel cut shoulders and three neck rings. The stopper is a hollow mushroom with panal cut sides and radial cutting to the top. Made circa 1820.

This is decanter is nice mix of Georgian and Regency features with the shape and neck rings of an earlier style and panel cutting of later.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 250

Height: 8 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

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