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SHIPS DECANTERS

Ships decanters with a wide base were originally created for use on sailing ships, the idea of the wide base being they were less likely to fall over in bad weather. By the 20th century they were just a popular and nostalgic shape, and only one of the ships decanters I own may have actually been used on a ship.

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Description, References and Size

This is a Regency Rodney or ships decanter. It has fluted cutting around the base and the shoulders are panel cut with those cuts running over the four bladed neck rings. The mushroom stopper has a panel cut neck with a radially cut top. Made circa 1820s.

This is a fantastic decanter but unfortunately it is in poor shape. There are some reasonable sized chips to the pouring lip and half the stopper peg is broken away. Apart from that, it's great. To me though this is a real live ships decanter that probably came off a real life sailing boat. What more could a boy want.

I mention the name Rodney in the description as they are also known as Rodney decanters after Admiral Rodney who fought the French and Americans in the 1700s.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 194

Reference: Great British Wine Accessories 1550-1900, Robin Butler, page 136

Height: 8.27 inches

Width: 7 inches

A Holmegaard ships decanter with four neck rings and lozenge stopper with gilt edging. Holmgaard model number 6190, made circa. 1950-56.

At first glance this looks like a Georgian decanter but there are things not right about it, in particular the sharp edge to the base. Regardless of this, it is a good decanter and I think it quite scarce.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 261

Height: 11 inches

Width: 8 inches

A ships decanter with a plain body and the three neck rings are true applied neck rings. The stopper is a cut bullseye. Designed by T. Jones of Stevens and Williams Ltd. in 1963.

An elegant plain decanter in the style of Georgian ship decanters, circa.1800. The key difference between this decanter and the Georgian ones is that the stopper is not a true disc as the antique bullseye stoppers are and has a clean polished peg. This decanter also has very little wear to the base, and none of the scratches and scuffs that comes with 200 years of use.

Beware dealers either through ignorance or mischief occasionally try to sell these and similarly new decanters as Georgian. Real Georgian ship decanters like this are pretty rare and so command stiff prices. Before you part with your money, get it in your hands and think carefully, does this look 200 years old. The stopper peg should not be shiny and polished.

It should be noted that from 1931 Stevens and Williams Ltd. were selling their glass under the name Royal Brierley, and some of these decanters may have etched Royal Brierley underneath.

Reference: English and Irish Glass, Geoffrey Wills, part 16, page 9.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 7 inches

This is a ships decanter with a low cylindrical body and a solid stopper that mirrors the body shape. It's pattern number is FT15 and it's called the Ship's Decanter, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1967.

This is a really nice balanced design. I see a lot of them around so they must have been pretty popular. The Midnight and Kingfisher versions of this decanter are much rarer, so keep an eye for those.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 83.

Reference: Frank Thrower & Dartington Glass, page 59.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, page 243.

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Height: 9 inches

Width: 6 inches

This is a ships decanter with a low cylindrical body and a solid stopper that mirrors the body shape. It's pattern number is FT15 and it's called the Ship's Decanter, in the colour Midnight, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1967.

I managed pick up the more desirable colour of the decanters. I have noticed that the colour seems to vary between grey-green and grey-blue depending on the light. In 1979 Dartington produced a modified version of their ships decanters with a thicker neck on the stopper. There are also some very similar shaped Scandinavian decanters in which the body is coloured and the stopper is clear.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 83.

Reference: Frank Thrower & Dartington Glass, page 59.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, page 243.

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Height: 9 inches

Width: 6 inches

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