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STUART CRYSTAL STRATFORD PATTERN

In some ways the Stuart Crystal Stratford pattern seems ubiquitous and unremarkable, but it was designed by Ludwig Kny in 1921. Yes, 1921! It is so simple, just a set of horizontal molded bands, but I am sure that in 1921 it seemed totally fresh. It is such a design classic that you see lots of "similar" glass too.

I don't know how long it was produced for, but there is masses of it out there, and some of it is really cheap. If you are looking for an affordable quality design classic, I think this is the way to go. Remember there are plenty of affordable design classics that are not quality, to me this is a winner in all three stakes.

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Decanters

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Description, References and Size

These amber Stuart Crystal decanters are based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. They are pattern number 25931 and probably made in the 1930s. The style of makers mark was used from 1926-50.

A Stratford decanter this shape does not appear in the 1927 Stuart Crystal catalogue that I own, but it does appear in 1930s references.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart Crystal 1930s Catalogue

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This amber Stuart Crystal decanter is based on the Stratford pattern, with additional stylised floral pattern in a band around the body and the stopper. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND, it was probably made in the 1930s. The style of maker's mark was used from 1926-50.

This decanter is a derivation of the decanter above, essentially the same with a bit of additional cutting. Exact copies of this are not in my references so I don't know the pattern number, but I am happy with the dating I have given it.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart Crystal 1930s Catalogue

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

These are Stuart Crystal decanters based on the Stratford pattern, with flat topped mushroom stoppers. Pattern number 21699 made from 1921 and into the 1930s.

This must be the original Stratford decanter design as it appear to have the lowest catalogue reference number. The body of this decanter is the same as the amber ones, it is only the stoppers that are different, so it is all a matter of taste for the customer. These flat top ones look more masculine than the ovoid topped ones.

I did say I wasn't going to do any real research on my website, and here I am breaking my own rules trying to figure things out.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 508

Reference: Stuart and Sons 1927 and 1930s Catalogues

Height: 7 and 10.5 inches

Width: 3.25 and 4.5 inches

This uranium green Stuart Crystal water/lemonade jug is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

The Stuart Crystal Stratford pattern is recognised by a series of moulded steps formed into horizontal rings around the base and shoulder of decanters and the base of the bowl in glasses bowls and jugs. I believe this colour is a later one and example may even be post war.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 6 inches

Width: 6.25 inches

This apple green Stuart Crystal water/lemonade jug is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of this mark was used from 1926-50.

I believe this colour is apple green on the basis that I don't believe the more fluorescent colour green I have with the other decanter can be apple green. Apple green is an earlier colour for the Stratford pattern so this is probably pre-war. Obviously I could be completely wrong and would be happy to know if I am.

Note that this jug is a bigger than the previous. If you don't happen to have your tape measure with you when buying, the rule of thumb seems to be, if the handle protrudes above the rim of the jug, it is a smaller jug. The simple reason for this being is, they can make the jug smaller but they can't makes the hands that pick them up smaller.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 7 inches

This apple green Stuart Crystal tumbler is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

This tumbler is a part of a lemonade set (jug and tumblers or tall glasses) with the apple green jug above.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This sky blue Stuart Crystal water/lemonade jug is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

I have no idea when this sky blue colour came into the sequence of events for the Stratford pattern so this jug could have been made from 1921 through to somewhere in the 1970s. Would be happy to know if anyone has info on this.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 7 inches

This sky blue Stuart Crystal tumbler is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

As with the other green tumbler, this is a part of a lemonade set (jug and tumblers or tall glasses) with the sky blue green jug above.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This Stuart Crystal water/lemonade jug is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

They do these in amber too, but I don't have one that colour yet.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: Stuart and Sons Catalogue 1927 issue, page 5

Height: 6 inches

Width: 6.25 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal cocktail shaker based on the Stratford pattern. The is clear glass with two incised horizontal bands that have been enamelled blue around the body and blue band enamelled around the lip. It is etched underneath with the mark Stuart ENGLAND. This design is from 1933, and the etched mark was used from 1926-50.

Of the Stuart Crystal enamelled wares this is the most minimalist pattern, although it does have the extra that the rings are cut into the glass first before colouring. There are others with multi-coloured rings. This cocktail shaker probably comes in green and red too, as I have glasses from this service in those colours as well.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles R. Hajdamach, pages 117-122

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 3 1990, page 29

Height: 10.75 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

These are Stuart Crystal cocktail glasses based on the Stratford pattern. The is clear glass incised with a horizontal band that have been enamelled blue, red and green around the bowl. The are further matching enamelled rings on the stem and foot. They are etched underneath with the mark Stuart ENGLAND. This design is from the 1930s, and the etched mark was used from 1926-50.

These are three glasses from a set of 4 or 6. The question is what were the other colours. If there were just four glasses I would expect the other glass to be yellow, but if there were six, the other colours might be yellow, orange and black, or just a repeat of these colours. Until I see more glasses, I won't know. As these are the only glasses of this type I have seen, I am not holding my breath.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles R. Hajdamach, pages 117-122

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 3 1990, page 29

Height: 10.75 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal cocktail shaker based on the Stratford pattern. The base is of amber glass the rest of the body and stopper being clear. It has enamelled designs with fighting cockerels on the body with one bird having killed the other, a band of forget me not flowers around the shoulder, black band on the edge of the pouring lip, and under the base a larger single forget me not flower head. It is etched underneath with the mark Stuart ENGLAND. This design is from 1933, and the etched mark was used from 1926-50.

The Stuart Crystal enamelled glass of this period was done with a transfer outline with was then hand painted over with the enamel. As this is described as enamel in all the books, this means it is not cold painted , but would have been reheated to fuse the enamel to the surface of the glass.

Whilst the subject matter here is quite morbid, cockfighting was banned in England and Wales in 1835 and in Scotland 1895.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles R. Hajdamach, pages 117-122

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 3 1990, page 30

Height: 10.75 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a set of 4 Stuart Crystal cocktail glasses based on the Stratford pattern. The feet and stems are amber glass, the bowl of the glass being clear. All are enamelled with scenes of fighting cockerels. They are all etched underneath with the mark Stuart Rd 681616. This design number was registered to Stuart and Sons Ltd. on 10th March 1921.

These four glasses depict the cock fight going through the stages of the fight with one bird ultimately winning. There are plenty of Stuart Crystal glasses of various designs showing the birds squaring off to one another, but these are the only glasses I have seen where one of the birds ends up dead. Maybe this is why I was able to get these at a reasonable price. The way I look at it, they are what they are.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles R. Hajdamach, pages 117-122

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 3 1990, page 30

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal cocktail shaker based on the Stratford pattern. It has enamelled designs with a large cockerel on the body, a band of flowers around the shoulder and top of the stopper. It has Etched underneath with the mark Stuart. This design is used from 1921, and the etched mark was used from 1926-50.

This cocktail shaker is not as gruesome as the previous one, and so maybe more commercial. I am not sure how many different cockerel designs Stuart used on these cocktail shakers as the two I have are different from those in the books. So I can only suppose they had several.

To my eye the bird facing left feels wrong, and also the bird is in a fighting stance as illustrated by the above glasses. It wouldn't surprise me if this shaker didn't start out as one of a pair with two cockerels facing off to each other. That would make sense to me.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association Volume 3 1990, page 30

Height: 10.75 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is an amber Stuart Crystal cocktail shaker based on the Stratford pattern. It has Etched underneath with the mark Stuart. This design is used from 1921, and the etched mark was used from 1926-50.

This is the plainer more common version of the above cocktail shakers. This is not as fancy as the enamelled version, but it still feels like a quality thing with its heavy solid glass stopper. Most cocktail shakers of this period and type have hollow stoppers and just don't have the same quality feel.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles R. Hajdamach, pages 117-122

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Height: 10.75 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is an amber Stuart Crystal Stratford pattern cocktail glass. Probably made from the late 1920s to early 1930s.

Although not purchased with above cocktail shaker this is the type of glass that would have gone with it, and again although this is plain, is it a really nice Art Deco shape.

This glass appears in the 1927 Stuart catalogue as a part of service pattern number 21696, but does not appear in the 1930s catalogue, which may explain why you don't see many glasses in this particular Stratford shape.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a uranium green Stuart Crystal Stratford pattern footed fruit bowl with everted lip. With no marks it is probably from the 1930s or possibly post war.

This is exactly the kind of high quality glassware you can find where wondering into charity shops. As it is lead glass it has a beautiful ring when you flick your fingernail at the rim. The colour will ping off your table.

Height: 8.25 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This amber Stuart Crystal liquor glass a based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; RD.681615 Stuart. Design registered 10th Match 1921.

There seem to be loads of variations on the shapes of these Stratford glasses, so if you are looking to make up sets, buy carefully.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Height: 2.75 inches

Width: 1.25 inches

This uranium green Stuart Crystal sherry or port glass is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; Stuart ENGLAND. Designed from 1921 and the pattern of mark was used from 1926-50.

Note if you are planning to make ups sets the clear and amber glasses are the most common, followed by the green and blue ones, there is a slight premium on the rarer colours you should be aware of.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This Stuart Crystal sherry or port glass with an acid etched cockerel is based on the Stratford pattern. Etched underneath with the mark; RD.681616 Stuart. Design registered 10th Match 1921.

The registration number relates to the shape of the glass and is not associated with the cockerel design. The cockerel is etched straight off a template. The reason it looks faint is because it is. I expect this glass could have been made at anytime from 1921 through to the war.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal Stratford pattern sherry or port glass with a knopped stem. Etched underneath with the mark; RD.681650 Stuart. Design registered 12th Match 1921.

As you can see the variations on Stratford glasses means you do need to look carefully when purchasing if you are looking to build a set. Whilst they may seem common there are many size variations, then shape variations, then colour, then cutting and etching and enamelling. If you don't care it is not all exactly the same, go for it. It is normally cheap when not in a complete of set 6 or larger.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This might be a Stuart Crystal Stratford pattern sherry or port glass with an inverted baluster stem. With no marks it is probably from the 1920s or 1930s.

I am a little uncertain of this glass and this is something you need to bare in mind whilst purchasing. This glass is unmarked, and it doesn't ring like lead crystal. The molded rings are just like the ones on the Stratford glasses, but the material is wrong... there is something fishy in the State of Denmark. Buyers beware!

In case you are not aware, if you flick your fingernail at a lead crystal glass, unless it is really thick glass, it will ring and hold a note. Inferior glass will make a much duller clunking noise.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 236

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 423

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Stuart Crystal sundae glass a based on the Stratford pattern, etched with a grapes and vine motif around the bowl. With no marks this pattern is from the 1920s and 1930s.

My personal thoughts are that these are a little cheesy for Stuart Crystal. The etching is done with a template and seems a little cartoony. So saying the glass is still up to the Stuart quality.

This glass appears in the 1927 Stuart catalogue as a part of service pattern number 21756, however, the etched pattern does not make a reappearance in the catalogue at the end of the 1930s. To my mind is says they wised up to how cheesy this pattern is.

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 4 inches

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