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WHITEFRIARS BOWLS

When you look at these and my vases I think you will find that my collecting tastes are reflected by what I have. There is also a lot of glass I have given away to my family and when I start to include that you will see a wider variety vases and bowls.

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Bowls

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Description, References and Size

This is an "Emerald" ribbon-trailed bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 8901. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1932.

Emerald is the rarest colour for this Whitefriars, so if you are looking to make up a harlequin set from a single design, then if you see an Emerald version of it, buy it.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 122

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 300 & 318

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 47

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24

Reference: English Glass, W.B.Honey, Page 46

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is an "Ruby" ribbon-trailed bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 8901. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1932.

I think this might be the largest size theses bowls come in. As you can see it still looks good at this size, and "Ruby" always looks good. Although the design is from 1932, most "Ruby" bowls were made post war.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 122

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 300 & 318

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 47

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24

Reference: English Glass, W.B.Honey, Page 46

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 6 inches

This is a "Sapphire" ribbon-trail fruit bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 8896. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1932.

I have described this as the fruit bowl version of the one above. This is a purely personal thing but I don't think this shape is as nice as the one above. It is probably more practical for putting fruit in though.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 122

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 300 & 318

Height: 8.25 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a small "Flint" footed ribbon-trialed dessert bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9319. Produced in the 1940s.

This is the same shape as the 8901 bowl but in minature. Some designs lose something for being made bigger or smaller but in this case, it still looks good in the flesh when it is smaller.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 123

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 273 & 290

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a footed ribbon-trailed large shallow "Sea Green" bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9031. Designed by Tom Hill in 1935.

This bowl was designed by Tom Hill who was a glass blower at Whitefriars. It might be argued that he took the 8901 bowl and flattened it, however, I think he made a very elegant job of flattening this bowl.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 122

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 300 & 318

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 47

Height: 12 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a footed large shallow "Sea Green" bowl with "Sapphire" ribbon-trail. Whitefriars pattern number 9031. Designed by Tom Hill in 1935.

These two-tone bowls and vases are much rarer than the monotone ones. "Sea Green" with "Sapphire" is the most common two-tone colours to find next is "Sapphire" and "Amethyst". There are other combinations but they are extremely rare.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 122

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 300 & 318

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 47

Height: 12 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a "Sea Green" spiral-ribbed bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9274. Designed by James Hogan or William Wilson in the 1940s.

I don't think this treat is as successful as the ribbon-trailed bowls and vases, and this green is especially dull (sorry all you Whitefriars crazies out there). If you are going to us a dull colour you need a great design.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 116

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 273 & 290

Height: 10.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a "Ruby" spiral-ribbed bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9274. Designed by James Hogan or William Wilson in the 1940s.

In Ruby it looks much better and this particular one more so as the glass must be thinner or something near the base so the light comes through.

As these two bowls are the same model in different colours I have taken the photos from slightly different angles to you can get a better feel for the shape of them.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 116

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 273 & 290

Height: 10.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is an "Sapphire" wrythen large shallow bowl, with applied foot ring. Whitefriars pattern number 7025. Produced in the 1940s.

These are made in that resuse of old techniques style so I suspect this was designed by Barnaby Powell who seemed to be into doing this.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 301

Height: 11.75 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a "Sea Green" wrythen large shallow bowl, with applied foot ring. Whitefriars pattern number 7025. Produced in the 1940s.

The Sea Green version is not nice as the Sapphire one, it doesn't ping in the same way, but these are nice bowls in a good size so you wouldn't walk away from it.

As these two bowls are the same model in different colours I have taken the photos from slightly different angles to you can get a better feel for the shape of them. And the answer is, they are really flat.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 301

Height: 11.75 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a "Sapphire" rib molded footed sundae dish. Whitefriars pattern number 9273. Produced in the 1940s.

I think these are OK bowls, but not exciting, like someone was asked to come up with a design and came up with this, as opposed to coming into work thinking I have a great idea.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 302

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a "Flint" rib molded footed sundae dish. Whitefriars pattern number 9273. Produced in the 1940s.

As this is the same shaped bowl as the one above I have taken it from a different angle in order to allow easier identification.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 302

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a "Ruby" rib molded footed sundae dish. Whitefriars pattern number 9273. Produced in the 1940s.

I still think this is a bit of a clumpy little bowl, but is does look better in "Ruby".

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 302

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a "Flint" ribbed-wave pattern fruit bowl. Wealdstone range for Wuidart. Produced in 1930s.

I can't actually find this bowl in any of my books or available catalogues, but it so easily fits into the Wealdstone range that is what I think it is. It is like someone took one of the Wealdstone vases and squashed it to make a bowl. Hmmm....who have I seen do that before.

Height: 8 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a "Sapphire" rib molded fruit bowl with an applied milled rigaree foot ring. Whitefriars pattern number 8266. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1929.

This is a lovely bowl and it would grace anyones table with it's presence. It's Barnaby Powell looking back at old techniques and sqeezing them onto a great shape.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 225 & 300 & 305

Height: 12.5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a heavy "Sea Green" lobed bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9250. Designed by James Hogan in the 1940s.

In a way this is not a bowl or vase, it is a lump of glass designed to sit on your windowsil and look modern. You are not exactly going to put fruit in it and it is too flat and it is too wide to be practical for flowers. It's really a giant ornament.

I did have a 10 inch "Sapphire", and my wife broke my heart by dropping a wooden box on it and take a big chunk out of it. They look much nicer in "Sapphire", he says sadly.

This bowl appeared in an advert in 1938, and you will be pleased to know adverts were as full of it then as they are now, and I quote:"Two vases and bowl in clear Lead Crystal. Oval in shape and entirely "Hand-made", so enabling the Glass to retain a smoothness of skin as beautiful as that found in the best 18th Century Glass." Yep, same BS then as you have now.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 131

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 324

Reference: British Glass Between the Wars, Roger Dodsworth, page 20

Height: 8 inches

Width: 5 inches

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