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WHITEFRIARS DECANTERS

My first love of decanters was for the Georgian ones, just for the sense of history, but I was also collecting pre-war Whitefriars vases, because of this I then started to appreciate the pre-war decanters. The UK art deco glass was not like the continental stuff, it was more subtle and soft, with gentler colours, and Whitefriars pre-war decanters are in with the best. At least to my eye they are.

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Decanters

This is a clear 1427 pattern decanter with a milled ring around the neck and pressed leaf stopper. Designed by T. G. Jackson in the 1870s.

This design is a classic of the Aesthetic movement. It's difficult to know what to say about it as it is so minimalist. It's very cool though.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 98

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 260

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 296

Height: 13 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a rib molded conical "Sea Green" Whitefriars 900 pattern decanter with a blown stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in the 1880s.

Thinly blown and uncut this design is in the vanguard of the movement away from heavily cut glass of the early Victorian era. This design was made up to at least 1940. So it was made for over 50 years. This is why some people are umming and arring over putting dates of things.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310 & 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 13 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a rib molded conical "Gold Amber" Whitefriars 900 pattern decanter with a blown stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in the 1880s.

Unless I get lucky my budget on these decanters only runs to the common colours such as golden amber or sea green.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310 & 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 13 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a rib molded conical "Flint" Whitefriars 900 pattern decanter with a blown stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in the 1880s.

Strangely "Flint" seems a bit less common than the above colours for this decanter.I have to say that in "Flint" it is a bit more boring and something about the quality of it in the other colours is lacking. It probably explains why I was able to get this one so cheaply as it was probably missed by the other buyers that might be on the hunt for a good bit of Whitefriars glass.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310 & 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 13 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a dark green conical decanter with four dents to the body and an applied neck ring. The silver stopper is hallmarked for London 1907 and makers mark is "JP&Ss", standing for James Powell and Sons.

The Lesley Jackson book dates the design of this bottle to the 1880s and the example shown does not have a stopper. With the hallmark really giving a spot on date of manufacture, it shows that this design was made for at least 20 years if not longer. Whitefriars bottles with silver stoppers are extremely rare, although mine is at the bottom end of the scale for such things.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 102

Height: 7 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a square based, tapered, "Sea Green" "Govette" decanter with a blown stopper that is the inverse shape of the decanter. It is Whitefriars pattern no. M54. Designed by Harry Powell circa.1930.

As this is the third one, you may think I have run out of things to say about this style of decanter, but I haven't. The other thing that interested me about this decanter was the name Govette. I have Googled like crazy, it is not word that has a meaning that I can find and it is not a place. Some people have Govette as their surname, but I don't know how that relates to this decanter, unless Harry Powell knew someone that looked like this decanter.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, Page 505 & 506

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 50

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Height: 15 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a square based, tapered, "Gold Amber" "Govette" decanter with a blown stopper that is the inverse shape of the decanter. It is Whitefriars pattern no. M54. Designed by Harry Powell circa.1930.

According to a 1933 copy of the Vogue magazine the shape of this decanter is based on an old Italian flask. The question that springs to my mind; was it a glass or leather flask, and how old was it? The person that could tell us would be an expert on old Italian flasks. This is how vagueness can make things lose meaning with time. Harry Powell is no longer around to be asked; exactly which flask did you mean? Consequently you now can't tell how derived this design is. Is it a straight forward copy, or did it get the Harry Powell twist to it, whatever that may be.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, Page 506

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 50

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Height: 15 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a square based, tapered, "Flint" "Govette" decanter with a blown stopper that is the inverse shape of the decanter. It is Whitefriars pattern no. M54. Designed by Harry Powell circa.1930.

I may have mentioned this elsewhere but in the world of Whitefriars, Flint means clear glass, and is based on what lead glass was originally called when it was invented. It was called flint then because at that time they used crushed flint instead of sand. They used crushed flint as it was purer than the sand on UK coasts and made clearer glass. Previously they had imported sand from Italy and the objective of inventing lead glass was to remove the need to import clear glass from Italy, and also remove the need to import the materials to make clear.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, Page 505 & 506

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 50

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Height: 15 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is an uncut plain "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M60 pattern decanter with a solid flat top stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1935.

From the same stable as the M62 pattern this decanter is more like a ships decanter

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 314

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 43

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 196 and 425

Height: 7.75 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is an uncut plain "Sea Green" Whitefriars M60 pattern decanter with a solid flat top stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1935.

Comparatively speaking the "Gold Amber" M60 decanters are quite common and the "Sea Green" ones less so. I don't know how much of a price difference this will make though.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 314

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 196 and 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 43

Height: 7.75 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a "Flint" Whitefriars M60 pattern decanter with a solid flat top stopper and the C455 pattern cut into it. Probably made in the 1950s.

This is a pretty rare version of the M60 decanter, where the M60 body has had this cutting pattern put on it. I am not always one for "modern" cut glass, but in this instance I totally approve. It looks really good.

One thing you will notice that is different on this decanter in comparison to the two previous M60 decanters is the neck of the stopper. The stopper as a whole is riding higher and the neck is more pronounced. The "Sea Green" stopper has no neck whatsoever, the "Amber Gold" stopper does have a neck. Whether or not this is deliberate or just allowable variation I do not know.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 314

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 196 and 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 43

Height: 7.75 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a dome footed uncut plain "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M61 pattern ellipse shaped decanter with a blown stopper. Designed by William Wilson in 1936.

Golden amber is another common James Powell & Sons colour for this period. This decanter and the one above are good references of the variation that can occur in totally free blown glass. The flint decanter sags more and its body and stopper are less ellipse shaped than the amber gold one.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 131

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 322

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 51

Height: 13 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a dome footed uncut plain "Flint" Whitefriars M61 pattern ellipse shaped decanter with a blown stopper. Designed by William Wilson in 1936.

Flint is the James Powell & Sons name for clear glass. In some ways this decanter looks totally modern, but in actual fact it is also backward looking as the foot and body shape are straight out of the late 18th century. Only the total austerity of make it appear modern.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 131

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 322

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 51

Height: 13 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is an uncut plain "Emerald" Whitefriars M62 pattern decanter with a solid flat top stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1933.

Emerald is the colour name given by James Powell & Sons, even so it is not to say this is the most emerald looking colour I have seen. Emerald is a rarer colour in the world of Whitefriars, so be prepared to pay a premium for it. Totally art deco in its ethos, and a nicely proportioned decanter.

The picture in the Lesley Jackson book and the Whitefriars catalogues have horizontal lines etched on them, however, I have never seen one in the flesh with those lines on them. So if you do see one, snap it up as it must be quite rare. If it is emerald too, do cartwheels as well, but don't let the vendor see you doing them.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: English Glass, W.B.Honey, Page 44

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is an uncut plain "Sea Green" Whitefriars M62 pattern decanter with a solid flat top stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1933.

Sea green is another colour name given by James Powell & Sons, and in this case is a good match for the name. Sea green is a more common Whitefriars colour at this time and I have seen this decanter in sea green more than any other colour, including clear, that is called "flint" in the James Powell & Sons lexicon of colours.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: English Glass, W.B.Honey, Page 44

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is an uncut plain "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M62 pattern decanter with a solid flat top stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1933.

I expect you are so pleased to know that I have the cheap coloured version of this decanter. It made your day.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: English Glass, W.B.Honey, Page 44

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is an uncut plain "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M67 pattern decanter with a with a bulbous body short stem and conical foot. It has a solid flat top stopper. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1933.

This is a pretty rare decanter and it is has taken me a while to get this one, in the apparently more common "Gold Amber" colour. It is a slightly gawky, pin headed, bottom heavy decanter, which may account for it being rarer.

What is strange about this decanter is that all the catalogue pictures of the decanter have a couple of horizontal lines running around the stopper but all the pictures of the real thing have a bubble within the stopper. The lines are depicting a ring of glass around the stopper making it appear a bit wider towards the top, and thus more in proportion. Without the ring it is just a mutant.

This decanter comes in the colours; Gold Amber, Sea Green, and Twilight. As usual I expect I have the common colour.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1935-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 46

Height: 10.25 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a rib molded cylindrical "Sea Green" Whitefriars M74 pattern decanter with a weave molded mushroom stopper. Made circa 1940.

Shape wise this decanter is looking back to the Georgian era but in a minimalist way. If you look in the section on Cylinder Decanters you will see some like this with a fantastic amount of cutting.

The weave molded stopper is not like anything I have seen on other decanters. Is is like a molten web of glass stretched over the top of the stopper.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310 & 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 39

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a cylindrical "Sea Green" Whitefriars M74 pattern decanter with a mushroom stopper. Made circa 1940.

You may think this decanter looks the same as the one above, but look carefully, the difference is quite subtle. This is the unmolded version, it's totally smooth in appearance. I see less of these so I think this unribbed version is rarer. You need to be a complete Whitefriars geek to be carried away by this difference in them. Either that, or you have thing about smooth glass. Even though I believe these to be rarer I very much doubt is has much impact on cost.

The other thing to consider in this being an unribbed version of the M74 decanter; this means there will also be unribbed versions of the M74 glasses and jugs.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310 & 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 39

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a cylindrical "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M74 pattern decanter with a weave molded mushroom stopper. Made circa 1940.

And this is the amber version of the molded one. I have seen a number of these molded decanters and I must say that there seems to be no exact science to the molding, particularly in the stoppers, where in some it is clear and in others, such as this decanter, it is more indistinct. Whilst molds are used in the making of these decanters, the underlying hand made nature of them shows through in the slight variations like this.

These decanters also come in the clear "Flint" colour. If you are looking buy one of these decanters you need to be careful as there other similar lower quality versions of it about. The diagnostic in this is the stopper peg. The stopper pegs on the Whitefriars decanters are fully cut and polished. When looking at the peg the sides the peg should have a straight sides with a slight graduation and then on the bottom edge of the stopper there should be a cut bevel. If it doesn't have a cut bevel it is not Whitefriars. Other companies do bevels on the bottom edge of their decanter pegs, but the low quality copies of this decanter I have seen don't have it.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310 & 314

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 506

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 425

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 39

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is an uncut plain "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M80 pattern decanter with a with a "Flint" bulbous body and "Gold Amber" short rounded stem and foot. It has a solid flat top "Gold Amber" stopper. Produced circa.1950s.

This is another rare decanter, i.e. I have only ever seen a line drawing of it before. The proportions of this one seem much more in balance than they do in the M67, as it has a slimmer stem more in proportion with the stopper. The two-tone effect is quite nice too.

Where the stem meets the foot does seem to be a weak point, which may be why you don't see many of them. The decanter photographed in the Wendy Evans book is this decanter body but with a cut pattern. No reference is given for it though.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 328

Reference: Whitefriars 1957 Catalogue, page 39, on the Whitefriars.com website.

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a cylinder shaped "Snowflake" M171 pattern decanter with a teak and cork stopper. Designed by Geoffrey Baxter circa. 1967-1974.

After saying I wouldn't have any Geoffrey Baxter stuff I broke my promise and bought this as it was a bargain. At one level I really hate this stuff as I don't see the skill in making of it, but at another level it is so designer, of its period, and like nothing before it. You have to admit Geoffrey Baxter did not look back in the designs he produced, but produced stuff of his time.

This is not in the Whitefriars books and I would like to credit Chris Cooper from the Facebook page A Whitefriars Glass Collectors Group with helping me to identify this piece in the Whitefriars catalogues. You should join it if you like Whitefriars it seems full of nice and knowledgeable people.

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

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