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WHITEFRIARS PRE-1900 TABLEWARE

The Whitefriars factory when taken over by James Powell and Sons in 1834 was producing what I have heard described as generic Victorian glass. I'm afraid this is true, but in the late 1860s they started producing glass in the Venetian style and every thing changed.

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Tableware

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Description, References and Size

This is a wine goblet with the frosted bullrush pattern on the bowl, slice cut stem and star cut base. Made circa. 1855.

This pattern is is the Whitefriars 1855 pattern book, however this pattern was produced by other makers so there is no garantee that this glass if by Whitefriars. It's in the pattern book and this is good enough for me to put it in this section.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 252

Height: 6.25 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a guest water carafe with the frosted bullrush pattern and slice cut neck. Made circa.1855.

These are probably from the same service as the goblet above, and stand a good chance of having been made by Whitefriars. And yes, I am showing off by showing that I have three of them.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 252

Height: 7 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a wine goblet with a frosted classical palmate pattern the bowl, with slice cut hollow knop and inverted baluster stem and star cut foot. Made circa.1855.

This is a more unusual pattern and I have been informed that is it most likely to be a Whitefriars.

I would like to thank Nigel Benson of http://www.20thcentury-glass.org.uk for advising me on this.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 252

Height: 7.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a uranium green wine glass with a cut inverted baluster stem and the lower half of the bowl is quilt molded. Made c.1855.

Usually you would totally ignore a glass like this apart from that this exact design appears in the 1855 James Powell & Sons catalogue. You will frequently see glasses like this in antique centres and not know who they are made by, but this is the only one I have seen with all of the features combined in the 1855 catalogue. It may that it is not by Whitefriars and that someone was either copying them or they were copying someone else, but I think it is close enough to the illustration for it to be here.

The colour is not stated with the glass in the catalogue but this deeper coloured uranium green is one that was in fashion at that time. The Uranium green that you see later between the wars is usually a brighter more acid colour.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 252

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a wine glass with an inverted baluster stem. Designed by T.G. Jackson in the 1870s.

This is the cheaper version of the glass that everyone wants, in that is it not coloured or opaline. Even though it is plainer than the glass below, it still has a delicate quality feel about it.

The thing about this glass is that it might be mistaken for any old wine glass, so there is the chance that you may find one lurking out there waiting to be picked up at a bargain price.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 97

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 310

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 408

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a rib moulded blue opal wine glass with an inverted baluster stem. Designed by T.G. Jackson in the 1870s.

If you are a collector of older Whitefriars glass this is one of the must have items a collector wants, and of course it is totally beautiful and delicate and I can't imagine anyone drinking out of it.

I have no idea how it is really done in practice, but the white banding effect is created by reheating the glass in the furnace in a very exact way.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 97

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 70 & 310

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 408

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a dark green opal wine glass with an inverted baluster stem and a bulge mid way around the bowl. Designed by T.G. Jackson in the 1870s.

This is another classic T G Jackson design, the collectors of older Whitefriars want to have. I don't know how common these were, but I paid surprising little for mine from a serious dealer.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 97

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 70 & 310

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 408

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a blue opal finger bowl and stand, pattern number 834, both with frilled rims. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1877-1910.

If you are looking for some either straw or blue opal glass, and finger bowl and stand like this is actually cheaper than the single glass above. Desirable glasses always have a premium over other pieces of glass.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 102

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 263

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 5.5 inches

This is a classically shaped straw opaline jug. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1890s.

This is a very rare jug and the fact that it was a cheap eBay purchase by me, shows that it is worth learning your stuff and keeping your eyes open.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 56 & 99

Height: 10 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a honeycomb moulded wine glass with a hexagonal bowl and a two-strand twisted stem. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1890s.

This is probably one of the least structually sound glasses I own and is an incredible survivor. The people who bought these to use probably expected to get through them in short order.

I would like to thank Nigel Benson of http://www.20thcentury-glass.org.uk for advising me on this.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 75

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a wine glass with two-strand twisted stem. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1890s.

The twisted stem glasses are another must for early Whitefriars collectors. They are nice enough but...not my favourite.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 104

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a "Poppy Head" wine glass with with four dents in bowl and an everted rim. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1890s.

These are really nice glasses, and you need to watch out for them, as they come in different sizes and colours. So if you see a glass like this and the proportions of the bowl look different to this one or it's dark green or something, if it is find and delicate it is probably still a "Poppy Head" glass. This is the largest version of it, so the bowl is proportionally bigger in comparison to the stem and foot of the smaller versions.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 105

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a "Poppy Head" rib moulded custard glass with four dents in bowl and an everted rim. Probably designed by Harry Powell circa.1890s.

I have been led to believe this rib moulded poppy head service is quite rare and that no one knew they did custard glasses too. I wasn't even sure this was Whitefriars, I just thought it might be and it's only £3. This is a lesson in not just knowing every pattern but knowing the kind of thing companies make as not everything is in the books.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 104

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 75

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a champagne coup with a wrythen bowl and foot and an elongated inverted baluster stem. This is Whitefriars pattern number 2445. Designed by Harry Powell in 1898 and produced until the mid-1930s.

This is a really fine quality delicate glass and lucky to have survived.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 56

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a claret glass with a wrythen bowl and foot and an elongated inverted baluster stem. This is Whitefriars pattern number 2445. Designed by Harry Powell in 1898 and produced until the mid-1930s.

You may think I am being posh calling it a claret glass but that is what it is called in the book. Wherever possible, I am trying to use the naming convention that Whitefriars used for its glasses.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 98

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a "Flint" rib moulded drawn stem trumpet port glass. This is Whitefriars pattern number 900. Designed by Harry Powell circa. 1880s.

Really simple nice quality glasses, that you can still find cheaply if you have sharp eyes. They were made from the 1880s to the 1930s.

"Flint" is the colour deisgnation that Whitefriars gave to clear glass. This copies the name given to early lead glass, as it was made using crushed flints in stead of sand.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 290 & 310

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 49

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a dark green rib moulded drawn stem trumpet port glass. This is Whitefriars pattern number 900. Designed by Harry Powell circa. 1880s.

No record exists in the Whitefriars books of this glass in this colour. Some of my other early Whitefriars glass is in this colour, which makes me suspect that these glasses were made earlier in the long period these glasses were made for.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 290 & 310

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 49

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a sky blue rib moulded drawn stem trumpet port glass. This is Whitefriars pattern number 900. Designed by Harry Powell circa. 1880s.

This colour is preceeds the later "Sapphire" colour that Whitefriars is better known for and differs in that is more opaque.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 290 & 310

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 49

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a "Sea Green" rib moulded drawn stem trumpet sherry glass. This is Whitefriars pattern number 900. Designed by Harry Powell circa. 1880s.

This glass came as a part of a set with the conical "sea green" decanter in the Whitefriars decanter section.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 290 & 310

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 49

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" rib moulded drawn stem trumpet sherry glass. This is Whitefriars pattern number 900. Designed by Harry Powell circa. 1880s.

This glass also came as a part of a set with the conical "Gold Amber" decanter in the Whitefriars decanter section. If you are that way inclined (i.e. not patient or rich enough to make or get a set all the same colour) you could make harlequinn sets with these glasses.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 290 & 310

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 49

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" rib molded drawn stem trumpet goblet. This is Whitefriars pattern number 900. Designed by Harry Powell circa. 1880s.

In using the names port glass and goblet I am using the names associated with these glasses in the Lesley Jackson book. This glass is much larger than the port glasses and you can see that extra size has been created by the bowl much larger relative to the stem. By the time they get to this size they have a beautiful ring but seem very delicate. Note the difference in the proportions of this glass to the one above, most of the two inch height difference is in the bowl and the angle of the trumpet is wider.

This glass is a part of a suit of glasses designed by Harry Powell and to go with it are glasses of various sizes, and decanters. So if you like these glasses, don't rush out buying every glass this shape you can find. These are quality glasses and what sets them out from other glasses is the quality and this is quite a subtle thing. Buy at least one glass that is being sold as being from a 900 service and study it carefully and then when you are out and about keep your eyes peeled. I am showing four different colours here and pale blue ones exist too.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 103

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 290 & 310

Height: 7 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a thinly blown conical carafe, with the an base oval made by Whitefriars. There is an applied crimped trail to one side and frilled trail around the neck. This carafe also has an etched heraldic cifer of an eagles head and crown. Whitefriars pattern number J.1. Made circa 1870s.

In the Whitefriars catalogue this carafe is referred to as "The Oval ‘Leather Bottle’", the form presumably having been inspired by early flasks made of leather which are this shape and have a sown seam to one side.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 262

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 450

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a thinly blown conical cup mouthed carafe, with the an base oval made by Whitefriars. There is an applied crimped trail to one side and frilled trail around the neck. Made circa 1890s.

The carafe like this shown in the Leslie Jackson book in a photograph dated 1896, has a silver and cork stopper. I have yet to see one with it's actual stopper. Even with a stopper this is still considered a carafe (you figure it out).

Whitefriars weren't the only company reputed to have made this type of carafe, the next most frequent attribution being Stuart & Sons. I think this attribution is wrong, as I have a marked Stuart piece and although similar it is not the same. Unless someone can show these carafes in a Stuart catalogue I don't think it is correct.

You may also notice how this carafe and the one above differ although they are both by Whitefriars. I can only attribute this difference to the 20 years age difference between them as illustrated from source material in the books. As I see the cup mouthed versions more frequently it would make sense that they are the more recent version.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 30

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 450

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a liquer glass with a shallow cut hexagon patten to the bowl and slice cut stem. This is Whitefriars pattern number 1147. Designed by Harry Powell in 1894 and produced until the 1930s.

This glass is a part of a suit of glasses designed by Harry Powell and to go with it are glasses of various sizes, finger bowls, decanters and I expect others. So if you like this one, don't fixate on this size/shape of glass look out for this cutting in different patterns.

The pattern itself was copied from a Roman glass bowl that was excavated in Germany.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 77 & 289

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 43 & 103

Height: 4 inches

Width: 1.5 inches

This is a Whitefriars footed tumbler with a shallow cut hexagon pattern bisected by thin cut grooves. This is Whitefriars pattern number 8000. Designed by Harry Powell in 1906 and produced until the 1930s.

This glass is a part of a suit of glasses designed by Harry Powell and to go with it are glasses of various sizes, finger bowls, decanters and I expect others. So if you like this one, don't fixate on this size/shape of glass look out for this cutting in different patterns.

The hexagon pattern itself was copied from a Roman glass bowl that was excavated in Germany.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 77 & 289

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 43 & 103

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

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