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WHITEFRIARS SQUARE MOLDED DECANTERS

Designed by Harry Powell this glass is based on a Roman jug in the British Museum. Harry Powell liked to use glass designs from previous eras and remodel or reuse them. From this Roman jug Harry Powell also extrapolated jugs, claret jugs, decanters and perfume bottles. They come in "Flint", "Sky Blue", "Sea Green", "Gold Amber", dark green, and the original amber colour which is a kind of khaki colour.

Although I have called this section square molded decanters, there are also claret jugs and jugs within this range, also there are different colours, sizes and shapes and mushroom and leaf stoppers and rib molded too.

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Description, References and Size

This is a "Sea Green" square molded decanter. Whitefriars pattern number 1460. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

This is the largest decanter in this range.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 315

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 48

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is an "Flint" square molded decanter with a blown mushroom stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 8901. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

I think this "Flint" colour is actually rarer than the "Gold Amber" and "Sea Green" versions and as I have explained elsewhere, in the world of Whitefriars "Emerald" is the rare colour and the one everyone wants.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 315

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" square molded decanter. Whitefriars pattern number 1460. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

Here is the most common colour and the reason why I have all three versions of this large size. Theoretically they are not from the same service as the jug below is a part of the M54 service which this is not. It's weird because the "gold Amber" decanter, jug and claret jug were purchased together and are clearly a service together, when compared to the rest of the M54 service the jug is clearly tacked on from whatever this service might be called.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 315

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 48

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 7 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a square mold blown "Gold Amber" jug with an applied handle. The ribbed angled handle is applied bottom to top, but applied at the top in the roman manner. Whitefriars pattern number M54. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

I have not seen any of these jugs other than in the books. The way the handle is attached at the top looks quite fragile and I suspect liable to break if the jug were full, which might be why I don't really see the jugs as much as the claret jugs and decanters.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 311

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 51

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" square molded claret jug. The ribbed angled handle is applied bottom to top, but applied at the top in the roman manner. Whitefriars pattern number 2091. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

The claret jug is the item that is closest to the original roman jug that these square molded decanters, jugs and claret jugs are based upon. That jug was just like this but without the stopper. It was not like the jug above with a wide mouth and pouring lip.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 40 & 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289 & 314

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 44

Height: 8 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a khaki square molded claret jug. The ribbed angled handle is applied bottom to top, but applied at the top in the roman manner. Whitefriars pattern number 2091. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

The colour of this is supposed to be the original Whitefriars amber colour. To my eyes it doesn't look anything like amber, it is completely different, darker and browner.

I have taken this photo from a different angle to the previous claret as in shape they are exactly alike, but I thought it would help see how distinctive this handle is. It is distinctive from every angle.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 40 & 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 298 & 314

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 44

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a "Sky Blue" square molded claret jug. The ribbed angled handle is applied bottom to top, but applied at the top in the roman manner. Whitefriars pattern number 2091. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

This "Sky Blue" is again a rarer colour for these claret jugs, so now all I need are the more common colours of "Flint" and "Sea Green".

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 40 & 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 298 & 314

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 44

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a dark green square molded decanter with a blown mushroom stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 1460. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

Dark green is not listed in the later Whitefriars catalogues as one of the colours this decanter is available in, in fact I haven't seen is listed as a colour for anything in the later catalogues. I can only assume that this is an early decanter that was made closer to the 1908 design date.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 315

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" ribbed and square molded decanter with a blown mushroom stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 1460. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

Look at the body of this decanter carefully and you will notice that in addition to the textured surface it also has vertical ribbing. I don't know if this was available across the whole range but you definitely see less of these decanters with the ribbing.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 315

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 48

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is an "Flint" square molded decanter with a crimped leaf shaped stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 1460. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

Here is an example of the other stopper option for these decanters. These really hark back to the more art nouveau glass that Whitefriars produced and the decanters with the leaf shaped stoppers are more desirable than the mushroom stoppers.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 48

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a "Flint" ribbed and square molded decanter with a crimped leaf shaped stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 1460. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

This one is a double combo of rareness in that the body of the decanter has ribbed molding and it has a crimped leaf stopper. A pity is it not "Emerald", as I would have had the triple.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 48

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 7 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is an a "Sea Green" square molded perfume bottle with a solid mushroom stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 8544. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

These are not a part of the above service, but it has come straight out of the same design book. They just shrank it down to make a perfume bottle. The key difference being it would have difficult to make a blown stopper this small so the stopper is solid.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 309

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 42

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is an a "Gold Amber" square molded perfume bottle with a solid mushroom stopper. Whitefriars pattern number 8544. Designed by Harry Powell in 1908.

This is an "Gold Amber" version of the above perfume bottle. Note how the stopper is riding a bit higher than the bottle above. I think this is down to a lapse in quality in the above bottle as the bottle and stopper are correctly numbered in both cases, but the above stopper is just a bit low in the neck.

I may not have mentioned this before but it was common practice for glassworks to scratch numbers on the bottles and stoppers as each stopper was tailored to a particular bottle. Once a stopper was trimmed to fit they would scratch a number into both so that they wouldn't get muddled up later. These numbers are only relevant to the batch being made so those numbers are not unique and are generally low. The number on this bottle is 10 and the number on the "Sea Green" one above is 28. I would consider 28 to be a relatively high number in the scheme of things.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 309

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 42

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 297

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a "Sea Green" ovoid perfume bottle with a solid mushroom stopper. Probably made circa.1930s.

Obviously this is not a square molded decanter, but there are two very good reasons for it to be in this section, the form of the stopper kind of puts in with these bottles and I didn't know where else to put it. This bottle is not in any of the Whitefriars or catalogues that I can see, but whe I saw it there were two defining elements that screamed this is Whitefriars, first the colour is an exact match for "Sea Green" and second the stopper is exactly the same shape as stoppers for these square molded decanters. They have just reused this design component.

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

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