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WHITEFRIARS POST-1900 TABLEWARE

Some of the glassware in this section may go with decanters in the other section but much of it won't, partly because I haven't loaded those pictures yet.

I hope this section will really help you find those glasses to go with your decanters. Having a set really looks the part if you are planning to use your glasses and decanters. I can highly recommend it for that fine dining at home experience.

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Tableware

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Description, References and Size

This is a "sea green" diamond molded tumbler with an applied rigaree ring around the base. It is Whitefriars pattern No. 1181 Designed by Harry Powell in 1918.

This glass was designed to resemble glass that was being excavated on the site of a 17th century Huguenot glasshouse in Gloucestershire at that time. There was a movement across Europe at that time to look backwards and produce art glass based on what had been produced historically.

The fact that this glass is essentially a knock off of something much older doesn't detract from it being a nice glass.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 46 & 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 286 & 306

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is an amber diamond molded tumbler with an applied rigaree ring around the base. It is Whitefriars pattern No. 1181 Designed by Harry Powell in 1918.

You may notice that further down on this page amber is "gold amber". At the time this was designed, in the world of Whitefriars, amber was just amber, but at some point it started to be called "Gold Amber". Personally I can't see that the colour changed, so "Gold Amber" must purely be a marketing thing. These glasses are in the Whitefriars 1940 catalogue, by which time the term "gold amber" had come into existence, but I am a pedant and am sticking with calling it amber.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 46 & 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 286 & 306

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is an "Sky Blue" diamond molded tumbler with an applied rigaree ring around the base. It is Whitefriars pattern No. 1254 Designed by Harry Powell in 1918.

In the world of Whitefriars colours "Sky Blue" is not normally a rare one, but in this case you can stick your Golden Amber and Sea Green, Sky Blue is where it is at. I have seen plenty of Golden Amber and Sea Green versions of this glass, but this is the only Sky Blue I have seen. As this is a rarer colour expect to pay a premium for it.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 46 & 113

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 286 & 306

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Page 42.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a "gold amber" Whitefriars M3 pattern tumbler, slightly waisted to the lower part, with no pontil. Designed by William Wilson in 1933.

What the Hell, it's an M3. What happened to Whitefriars numbering system.

This glass is as thin as egg shell, which means it was incredibly cheap because they used hardly any glass or incredibly expensive as it was so difficult to make.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 130

Reference: Whitefriars 1938 catalogue on the Whitefriars.com website.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a mould blown sherry glass, with four slightly concave panels and a textured surface. These are Whitefriars pattern number M54. Designed by Barnaby Powell circa. 1930.

This pattern is a step out of time, it looks like something post war but it was produced at the height of art deco. You might think that this is a cheap piece of mould blown rubbish, but it is very delicately done, in lead crystal and hand finished as it has a polished pontil mark.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Page 50.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a mould blown "Gold Amber" sherry glass, with four slightly concave panels and a textured surface. These are Whitefriars pattern number M54. Designed by Barnaby Powell circa. 1930.

This is one of the more common colours to find this service in with the pale blue, known as "sky blue" being the rarest.

I have photographed this glass and the one above at different angles so that you can see what the concave panels look like more clearly.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 129

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 289

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Page 50.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a “Gold Amber” port glass, rummer style with a knoped stem. It has no pontil mark. Whitefriars pattern number M55. Circa. 1938

This glass is not in the Lesley Jackson or the Wendy Evans book and only appears as a line drawing in the 1938 catalogue, so it may not be readily recognised as a Whitefriars glass.

for those that think everything Whitefriars has a pontil mark, there you go, not everything.

Reference: Whitefriars Catalogue 1938

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M60 pattern shot glass with a solid base. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1935.

There is a M60 decanter to go with this, if you look in the decanter section. The modern world arrives, if you popped into IKEA and bought a box with a dozen of these in you wouldn't think they were designed over 80 years ago. These are such a simple design, but that current modernity after so long, that is where the gods of design live.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a "Sea Green" Whitefriars M60 pattern shot glass with a solid base. Designed by Barnaby Powell in 1935.

There is a M60 decanter to go with this, if you look in the decanter section.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 72 & 130

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 313

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a dome footed uncut plain "Gold Amber" Whitefriars M61 pattern port glass. Designed by William Wilson in 1936.

I have the M61 decanter to go with these if you look in the decanter section. It seems these are quite desirable, and I expect they might be quite rare as the glass is so thin.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 322

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 51

Height: 4 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a dome footed uncut plain "Sea Green" Whitefriars M61 pattern port glass. Designed by William Wilson in 1936.

I have the M61 decanter to go with this one too. This is the same as the glass above just a different colour. As elegant as this glasses look they are a little impractical to drink out of as the top rim bumps into your nose, or maybe I just have a big one.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 322

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 51

Height: 4 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a “Gold Amber” port glass, with a U shaped bowl and short stumpy stem. It has no pontil mark. Whitefriars pattern number M67. Circa. 1940.

This glass is not in the Lesley Jackson book and only appears in the rarer Wendy Evans book as a line drawing from the 1940 catalogue, so it may not be readily recognised as a Whitefriars glass. In addition to the "golden amber", according to the catalogue, it comes in "sea green" and flint.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 314

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a “Sea Green” sherry glass, with an ogee bowl and no stem. It has no pontil mark. Whitefriars pattern number M74. Designed by William Wilson circa. 1942.

This glass was designed to meet wartime ultilty requirements. As it is basically a glass with the stem removed, I suppose if hits the spot simplicity and cheapness. Not withstanding that these are lead glass and are finely made. Don't let the simplicity fool you, ping the glass with your finger nail and hear the ring of quality.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 131

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24.

Height: 3 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a “Golden Amber” wine glass or goblet, with an ogee bowl and no stem. It has no pontil mark. Whitefriars pattern number M74. Designed by William Wilson circa. 1942.

As much as amber is out of fashion I think the "Golden Amber" version of this glass looks better than the "Sea Green" ones. This is because the light refraction works so well they seem like they are glowing.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 131

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a “Golden Amber” jug, with an ogee bowl and no stem. Unlike the glasses it has a pontil mark. Whitefriars pattern number M74. Designed by William Wilson circa. 1942.

The jug just confirms that the "Golden Amber" is better than "Sea Green". If you want something that lights up your table go with "Golden Amber".

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, The Art of James Powell & Sons, Lesley Jackson, Page 131

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, Page 24.

Height: 7 inches

Width: 7.5 inches

This is a liquor glass, with a pale amber foot and stem and clear bowl. It has no pontil mark. Whitefriars pattern number M80. Circa. 1940s.

This tiny glass was quite difficult to identify and I could only do it with assistance. It is in the Whitefriars catalogues of 1949 and 1957, other than that I can't really pin down any more information on it.

I would like to thank Richard Caethoven from the FaceBook page, A Whitefriars Collectors Group, for helping me to ID this glass.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 328

Height: 2.25 inches

Width: 1.25 inches

This is a tall lager glass, with a golden amber foot, two applied amber rings around the stem and clear bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9316. Circa. 1957.

This is what you drink lager out of if you have class. These are beautiful statuesque super delicate glasses.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 326

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 44

Height: 8 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a tall lager jug, with a golden amber foot, two applied amber rings around the stem, amber handle and clear bowl. Whitefriars pattern number 9316. Circa. 1957.

The jug is just as lovely as the glasses. I doubt I will ever use them, one, because I don't drink lager, and two, I would be too scared to break them.

Reference: Whitefriars Glass, James Powell & Sons of London, Wendy Evans, Page 326

Reference: Whitefriars Revisited 1936-1969, Chris Woolman, Page 44

Height: 13 inches

Width: 7 inches

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