CRUET BOTTLES

Many of the patterns, shapes and styles of decanters have been brought down to cruet size. The key difference being proportional and that cruets will more often have tall slim cylindrical bodies. The other thing to bear in mind about cruets is that they are designed to fit in a stand and not stand on their own, consequently you will note that if a cruet were free standing on a table that was knocked, it would fall over.

Cruet bottles are almost as varied as decanters and are a cheaper and smaller alternative to collecting decanters.

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Cruet Bottles

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Description, References and Size

This is a Georgian shouldered cruet, it has shallow cutting with a facet cut neck, and a criss-cross pattern to the body. The pontil is roughly polished out. The stopper is missing but it would probably have been a short faceted spire shape. Made circa.1750.

This Georgian cruet is a similar shape to the shouldered decanters of the period. Glass cutting was shallow in this period because it the early days of glass cutting in England, and consequently the cutting was tentative. Also this is from before steam power and the cutting would have been performed using a foot powered treadle wheel.

The type of cutting to the body of this cruet is sometimes called Spanish cutting. This is because this technique was used in Spain on decanters and Whitefriars reused this technique in the early 20th century and called it Spanish cutting based on where the influence for their designs came from.

Reference: English and Irish Cut Glass 1750-1950, E. M. Elville, page 16

Reference: English and Irish Glass, W. A. Thorpe, Fig.23

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is barrel shaped Georgian cruet bottle with panel cutting around the base, followed by vertical blazes, a band of fine cross banding, and panel cut shoulders. It has a single faceted neck ring, and mushroom stopper with radial cutting. Made circa.1810.

This cruet is most similar to the barrel shaped spirit bottles of the time. These also would have been in a stand similar to the ones used for spirit bottles.

This cruet came from the Parkington collection. I bought from the collection auction at Christies South Kensington.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is cylinder shaped Regency cruet bottle with pillar cut body, steps cut to the shoulders and double bladed neck ring. It has a pillar cut mushroom stopper with an air bubble in the top. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a high quality cruet bottle that would have come from a silver cruet stand. I know this as I have a mustard pot from this set and it has a silver lid. It is most similar to the barrel shaped spirit bottles of the time. These too would have been in stands.

Reference: How to Identify English Glasses & Decanters 1680-1830, Douglas Ash, page 188 & 193

Reference: English Bottles & Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, page 47

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is cylinder shaped Regency cruet bottle with panels and grooves cut to the body, steps cut to the shoulders and single neck ring. It has a cut mushroom stopper folded down to an umbrella like shape, with radial cutting to the top and panels and grooves to the sides. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a cruet similar to the previous one but doesn't have quite such a high quality feel to it. The stopper is a rare and interesting mushroom shape, as it is like an umbrella. It looks solid, but it's not.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a footed teardrop shaped Regency cruet bottle with step cutting to the lower body, followed by a band of hobnail cutting to the middle and steps cut to the shoulders. It has a radially cut mushroom stopper. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a high quality cruet bottle that would have come from a silver cruet stand, but is actually quite small as if made for a single person as opposed to being shared on the table.

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 334

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a footed teardrop shaped Regency cruet bottle with step cutting to the lower body, followed by a band of hobnail cutting to the middle, steps cut to the shoulders, surmounted by a single neck on it's short neck and a serrated pouring lip. It has a radially cut mushroom stopper. Made circa. 1820-30.

It is clear this bottle is from the same style school as the one above. It is a style that orinated in the regency period where you have horizontal bands of different types glass cutting. It is a style continued and was copied in the 20th century, so you generally need to look very closely as the manufacturing quality and wear and tear.

Height: 4 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Victorian cruet bottle with vertical grooves and printies cut to the body, with the bottle having a single neck ring at the base of the neck. It has a peanut shaped stopper cut with panels and printies. Made circa. 1850-1900.

This type of cruet bottle was definitely around at the end of the Victorian era and are not in any of my Edwardian resources. As they are quite common I have put quite a wide timeline to account for that commonality.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, pages 40 & 42

Height: 8 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a Victorian bottle shaped cruet bottle with cross-hatch cutting and printies cut to the upper body, panel cutting to the shoulders and neck and double pouring lip. It has a peanut shaped stopper cut with panels and printies. Made circa. 1850-1900.

This is a cheap cruet bottle that would have come from a silver plate cruet stand. During this period decanter stands (also known as decanter frames) with similar bottle shaped decanters were also made. These are quite impractical without a stand as they fall over so easily.

Don't give me a hard time saying the stopper is peanut shaped, I could say waisted ovoid, which is contradictory description.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, pages 40 & 42

Height: 7.75 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a Victorian bottle shaped cruet bottle with vertical grooves cut to the lower body, cross-hatch flower pattern to the upper body, and panel cutting to the shoulders and neck. It has a ball shaped stopper cut with printies. Made circa. 1850-1900.

Only marginally better quality than the previous cruet bottle this too would have come from a silver plate cruet stand. The marginally narrower base on this one makes it more impractical without a stand than the previous one.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, pages 40 & 42

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a Victorian cruet bottle with cut panels around the base, diamonds cut around the top half of the body, facets cut to the neck, and two sided serrated pouring lip. The stopper is a cut spire. Made circa. 1845-80.

I have date this one as earlier than the ones above on the serrated pouring lip. Also, I have seen the demise of the mushroom stopper described as it having spire rising out of the top of it. The mushroom stopper didn't really demise but it is a style that started in the William IV period.

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Victorian cruet bottle with grooves cut around the base, star patterns cut around the top half of the body, and facets cut to the neck. The stopper is a cut spire. Made circa. 1845-80.

I included this one as it has similarities to the one above, but is of a lesser quality.

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

These are Regency cruet bottles with panel cut waisted lower body, divided by two step cuts to a hobnail cut upper body. The shoulders of the body are surmounted by a drooping flange the upper surface being cut fine hobnails. The stopper is a drooping mushroom the upper edge being cut with fine hobnails surmounted by a radially cut button. Made circa. 1820-30.

I have never seen a decanter or cruet with the drooping flange above the shoulder as this has. The bands of fine hobnail cutting and the button on the top of the stopper are characteristics of Irish glass so these may be Irish.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a cylinder shaped Regency cruet bottle with diagonal gooves cut to the lower body, surmounted by a band of hobnail cutting to the top half, and panels cut to the shoulders. It has a radially cut mushroom stopper. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is quite a small cruet that could be a perfume bottle but the demarcation line in the middle shows where the stand comes up to against the bottle.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 1.25 inches

These are Regency cruet bottles with panel cut waisted lower body, with a peacock feather design cut upper body. The shoulders are step cut and there is a single neck ring. The mushroom stopper is cut with grooves and fine hobnails mimicking design to the upper body. Made circa. 1820-30.

These are high quality cruet bottles that would have been expensive and fashionable at around the Regency period and a beyond.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Victorian cruet bottle with vertical grooves and printies cut to the body, with the bottle having a panel cut neck. The silver tops have concave cones surmounted round finials. Made London circa. 1848.

These cruet bottles have a slightly Gothic look to them that would have been fashionable at the time the tops were hallmarked for, however without the hallmarks it would be easy to supposed a later date.

There is a mustard pot to go with this bottle. Please check the Mustard Pot section.

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is an Anglo-Irish Regency cruet bottle with blazes cut around the base, diamonds cut around the waist, panel cut shoulders, and an annulated ring below a perforated silver top. There are no hallmarks to the silver top. Made circa. 1820s.

when sitting in it's cruet stand the rings of the stand would have come up to just below the cut diamonds on the body. Not all cruets bottles have this clear demarcation but pretty much all of them would have been in a set and have a stand.

I described this bottle as Anglo-Irish because of the blazes, the diamonds with stars and the annulated ring. These are all features that are seen on Irish glass, but are not exclusive to Irish glass, so I can't be definite.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

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