CRUETS

You may ask yourself; why are cruets included in this website? The question I could put back to you is; what is the difference between a very small or miniature decanter and a cruet? Small decanters the size of cruets exist and only by showing examples of cruets will the difference be seen.

Many of the patterns, shapes and styles of decanters have been brought down to cruet size. The key difference being proportional and that cruets often have tall slim cylindrical bodies. The other thing to bear in mind about cruets is that they are designed to fit in a stand and not stand on their own, consequently you will note that if a cruet were free standing on a table that was knocked, it would fall over.

If you are interested in collecting period glass and want something that is not as shelf consuming as decanters, and cheaper than drinking glasses, cruets are a good alternative. Single bottles are cheap and if you actually make up sets from your collection you are truly restoring old friends together and remaking a piece of the past.

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Cruets

This is a Georgian shouldered cruet, it has shallow cutting with a facet cut neck, and a criss-cross pattern to the body. The pontil is roughly polished out. The stopper is missing but it would probably have been a short faceted spire shape. Made circa.1760.

This Georgian Cruet is similar is shape to the shouldered decanters of the period. The shallow glass cutting of this period is because it the early days of glass cutting in England, and consequently the cutting was tentative. Also this is from before steam power and the cutting would have been performed using a foot powered treadle wheel.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Bristol blue urn shape cruet with a facet cut foot, shoulders, and pouring lip. It is gilded with repeating and geometric patterns on the foot, shoulder and pouring lip and the body is gilded sprigs of flowers detailed with scrafito work. This is a Made circa.1760-70.

I believe this is a James Giles Bristol blue cruet, the top gilder on glass in England at the time. James Giles [1718-80] is best-known as a decorator of Worcester porcelain. However, surviving documentation proves that around a fifth of his workshop’s output was in gilded and enamelled glass of the highest quality. Other than in known sets, no two pieces of James Giles work have been found to be the same and it is thought he produced a new design for every commission. James Giles bought his glass from the Whitefriars Glasshouse. This was before James Powell took it over 1834.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 143. Note the similarities in motifs and decoration treatment with the two urn shaped decanters in the top right hand corner.

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a lemon squeeze footed baluster shaped Irish Georgian cruet, with double bands of fish scale cutting near the top and bottom of the body and a single band of wheat husk cutting around the middle. The shaker top is made of copper with a small amount of its Sheffield plate still showing. This is a Made circa.1790.

I believe this to be an early Irish piece as the fish scale and wheat husk cutting combination is a classic Irish style of the period. Heat rolling thin sheets of silver onto copper and thereby fusing them is how silver plate, then called Sheffield plate, was made before electro plating was invented. The top is made with some precision as just pushing it on holds it in place and somehow this has carried on working for a couple of hundred years without wearing out. It's a really nice elegant little piece.

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is barrel shaped Georgian cruet bottle with panel cutting around the base, followed by vertical blazes, a band of fine cross banding, and panel cut shoulders. It has a single faceted neck ring, and mushroom stopper with radial cutting. Made circa.1810.

This cruet is most similar to the barrel shaped spirit bottles of the time. These also would have been in a stand similar to the ones used for spirit bottles.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is cylinder shaped Regency cruet bottle with pillar cut body, steps cut to the shoulders and double bladed neck ring. It has a pillar cut mushroom stopper with an air bubble in the top. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a high quality cruet bottle that would have come from a silver cruet stand. I know this as I have a mustard pot from this set and it has a silver lid. It is most similar to the barrel shaped spirit bottles of the time. These also would have been in stands.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is cylinder shaped Regency cruet bottle with panels and grooves cut to the body, steps cut to the shoulders and single neck ring. It has a cut mushroom stopper folded down to an umbrella like shape, with radial cutting to the top and panels and grooves to the sides. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a cruet to the previous but doesn't have quite such a high quality feel to it. The stopper is a rare and interesting mushroom shape.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is an urn shaped Regency cruet bottle with step cutting to the lower body, followed by a band of hobnail cutting to the middle and steps cut to the shoulders and a faceted neck ring. It has a radially cut mushroom stopper. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a high quality cruet bottle that would have come from a silver cruet stand.

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a footed globe and shaft shaped Regency cruet bottle with step cutting to the lower body, followed by a band of hobnail cutting to the middle and steps cut to the shoulders. It has a radially cut mushroom stopper. Made circa. 1820-30.

This is a high quality cruet bottle that would have come from a silver cruet stand, but is actually quite small as if made for a single person as opposed to being shared on the table.

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Victorian bottle shaped cruet bottle with cross-hatch cutting and printies cut to the upper body, panel cutting to the shoulders and neck and double pouring lip. It has a peanut shaped stopper cut with panels and printies. Made circa. 1850-80.

This is a cheap cruet bottle that would have come from a silver plate cruet stand. During the period this was made, decanter standard with similar bottle shaped decanters were also made. These are quite impractical without a stand as they fall over so easily.

Don't give me a hard time saying the stopper is peanut shaped, I could say waisted ovoid, which is contradictory description.

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a Victorian bottle shaped cruet bottle with vertical grooves cut to the lower body, cross-hatch flower pattern to the upper body, and panel cutting to the shoulders and neck. It has a ball shaped stopper cut with printies. Made circa. 1850-80.

Only marginally better quality than the previous cruet bottle this too would have come from a silver plate cruet stand. The marginally narrower base on this one makes it more impractical without a stand than the previous one.

Height: 6.5 inches

Width: 1.75 inches

This is a Regency cruet bottle with panel cut waisted lower body, divided by two step cuts to a hobnail cut upper body. The shoulders of the body are surmounted by a drooping flange the upper surface being cut fine hobnails. The stopper is a drooping mushroom the upper edge being cut with fine hobnails surmounted by a radially cut button. Made circa. 1820-30.

I have never seen a decanter or cruet with the drooping flange above the shoulder as this has. The bands of fine hobnail cutting and the button on the top of the stopper are characteristics of Irish glass so these may be Irish.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Georgian silver topped cruet, with shallow cut vesica within diamonds in a band around the middle of the body with shallow diamonds cut up the shoulders and neck. The silver top is of a classical type with a hinged lid. Silver hallmarks have been rubbed. Made circa. 1780-1800.

A lovely quality item, the only problem being that the hallmarks are virtually obliterated, with only the Lion being visible.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 175

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Georgian Sheffield silver plate topped cruet, with shallow cut vertical panels running length of body to top of neck. The silver top is of a classical type with a hinged lid. Made circa. 1780-1800.

The plate is worn in places and the copper base metal is visible in places. Another minor fault is that the two layers of copper that make up the handle have slightly delaminated at the bottom.

Height: 7 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a Regency cruet bottle with panel cut waisted lower body, with a peacock feather design cut upper body. The shoulders are step cut and there is a single neck ring. The mushroom stopper is cut with grooves and fine hobnails mimicking design to the upper body. Made circa. 1820-30.

These are high quality cruet bottles that would probably have been made for silver cruet stand.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

These Victorian cruets bottle with vertical grooves and printies cut to the body, with the bottle having a panel cut neck. The silver tops have concave cones surmounted round finials. Made London circa. 1848.

These cruet bottles would have come from a silver cruet stand.

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Georgian ellipse shaped cruet bottle with vertical moulded ribs to the body, with shallow notches cut into them. It has a square lemon-squeezer foot and pouring lip. The stopper is tear drop shaped and cut to a point. Made circa. 1790.

These free standing cruet bottles must have been reasonably common during the period they were made as although they are old they are not dfficult to find at a price.

Height: 7 inches

Width: 2 inches

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