PICKLE JARS.

The pickle jars shown here would have been made to sit on a silver or silver plate stand and you would use pickle forks to get the pickles out of them. This is not a thing done today as someone would need to take the pickles out of the jar they were purchased in and transfer them to these jars. This is something servants would do.

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Description, References and Size

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a rounded body and top of the body being cut with two rows of printies and the top with one row of printies. Made circa.late Victorian.

The cutting on this pickle jar and the one below is typical of the cutting on shaft and globe decanters from the mid to late victorian era.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Height: 6 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a rounded body and top of the body being cut with a row of printies and top being slice cut. Made circa. late Victorian.

This pickle jar is superficially similar to the one above, however, the cutting is simpler, and this jar would have been cheaper. Whilst probably not made by the same manufacturer, in general manufacturer valued things by the cost to manufacture and a lot of people bought on that basis regardless of whether something looked better.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Height: 5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a rounded body and the bottom of the body being cut with printies and the top of the body being cut with elipses. Made circa. Late Victorian.

The row of elipses seen cut to the top half of the body is a feature seen on very late Victorian and Edwardian shaft and globe decanters.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a cylindrical body cut with panels and a star cut lid. Made circa. William IV/Victorian/Edwardian.

This style of pickle jar appears in an Apsley Pellatt advert from 1838, but still appearing in catalogues nearly 70 years later, and I presume that is why you probably see them around so much. It does mean that you can't date them very accurately.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Reference: Nineteenth Century British Glass, by Hugh Wakefield, page 16

Height: 6.25 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a cylindrical body cut with panels and a panel cut lid. Made circa. William IV/Victorian/Edwardian.

This pickle jar is superficially similar to the one above but in detail they are not exactly the same for example the top of this one is panel cut and the one above is star cut, and the cut panels on this one come all the way to the base and the one above the base above curves up a little.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Reference: Nineteenth Century British Glass, by Hugh Wakefield, page 16

Height: 6 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a cylindrical body cut with panels and a panel cut lid. Made circa. William IV/Victorian/Edwardian.

This pickle jar only holds about half the volume of the ones above.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Reference: Nineteenth Century British Glass, by Hugh Wakefield, page 16

Height: 5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a Victorian pickle jar with a concave cylindrical body cut with panels and a star cut lid. Made circa. William IV/Victorian/Edwardian.

Of all the pickle jars I have this was probably the most expensive, it's heavier and somehow has a better finish to it.

Reference: The Victorian Catalogue of Household Goods, Dorothy Bosomworth, page 51

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Lanbridge, 1902 section

Reference: Nineteenth Century British Glass, by Hugh Wakefield, page 16

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 3 inches

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