MUSTARD POTS.

The common feature of the cruets I am describing here is removable or hinged lids that have a hole for a small spoon. All of these pots would have been part of a set and be on a cruet stand.

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Mustard Pots.

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Description, References and Size

This is a cylindrical Georgian cruet pot with shallow cutting to the the body cut, and silver top. The silver top has beading engraving and an urn shaped finial. The silver top has a cutout to allow the stem of a spoon to fit through. Made circa.1780-1800.

This type of glass cutting was typical of the highlighted era, but the thing to watch out for is that a lot of copies of this glass was made. When buying check carefully for wear and tear and the quality of the glass. If it looks and nice and shiny it's probably a copy.

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a Georgian cruet pot with an oval cylindrical body and the top of the body being cut with a frieze of shallow diamonds and the main bart of the body being cut with veritcal slices. The hinged silver top has an urn shaped finial. The silver top has a cutout to allow the stem of a spoon to fit through. The hallmark is incomplete but I believe it is London 1804.

What is great about this piece is the date I have been able to figure out from the hallmark, it fits quite well with how I date other pieces of glass with this type of cutting. In a way if gives a definite base date that can be used for other glass with this style of cutting, by this I mean that it could be earlier or later but I can justify saying this style of cutting was in use at this early date regardless of what references say. This is one of the useful features of cruets with silver fittings.

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a cylindrical Regency cruet pot with the upper half being cut with hobnails and the lower with vertical prisms and a hinged silver top. The silver top has a gardrooned rim and a ball finial. The silver top has a cutout to allow the stem of a spoon to fit through. There is no date mark but the silver is hallmarked for Sheffield 1814-1827.

This type of cutting is typical of higher quality glass of this from this period. This small pot has three layers cutting, with vertical prisms, some horizontal cut bands, surmounted by diamond shaped hobnails. Some decanters of the same period have up to four or five bands of different types of cutting. This type of horizontal banding of different kinds of cutting was fashionable at the time period of the hallmark and for a some years beyond.

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a cylindrical Regency cruet pot with a pillar cut body and a hinged gadrooned silver top with finial. The silver top has a cutout to allow the stem of a spoon to fit through. Hallmarks for Sheffield 1828.

I have bottles to go with this pot in the cruet bottle section. It's quite stylish how the gadrooning on the lid goes with the pillar cut body. Pillar cutting was a relatively short lived technique because apparently it was expensive to do. Even better, the 1828 hallmark drops right into the time slot for this type of cutting.

Reference: English Bottles & Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, page 47

Reference: How to Identify English Glasses & Decanters 1680-1830, Douglas Ash, page 188 & 193

Height: 4.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

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