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DARTINGTON GLASS

I don't have that much Dartington glass, and to be honest it's not my favourite manufacturer. As you probably know I'm a decanter nerd, and I just don't like the way they fit their stoppers. The fitting is so shallow, and it's rough. Why is it rough, everyones got the technology to do polished stopper pegs. Why rough? (rant over)

Other than trashing them, I should say Dartington were on trend and pounded all the traditional UK glass makers into the ground. Not really, but they out existed the others by making what people bought. The legend that knew what people wanted was Frank Thrower, who churned out design after design. Seriously though, stopper pegs aside, there are some good designs, they do have a certain look, and if you are looking to collect glass on a budget you need to have a look at Dartington because there is lots of it flying around under the radar.

Also, if you are thinking of collecting Dartington, I highly recommend the book, Dartington Glass, the First Twenty Years 1967-1987. It's a really great reference, but it seems to got expensive recently.

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Tableware

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Description, References and Size

This is a tear dropped shaped decanter with a ball stopper with a bubble in it. It's pattern number is FT188 and it's called the Directors Decanter, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1975.

This is a really simple design, which is a signature of a lot of the tableware that Frank Thrower designed. I should also point out that any Dartington design numbers that start with FT are designed by Frank Thrower. Nearly all the design numbers start with FT.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 72.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 7 inches

This is a "midnight" elongated tear dropped shaped decanter with a solid stopper that mirrors the body shape. It's pattern number is FT27 and it's called the Ad Hoc Decanter, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1967.

This is like the body of an Orrefors decanter and the stopper of a Holmegaard decanter, however, it's a nice elegant design so I'm not going to knock it.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 72.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 7 inches

This is a square bodied rough mold blown decanter with a solid ball stopper. It's pattern number is FT167 and it's called the Glen Dartington Decanter, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1974.

I am not so keen on this design, it seems to be following other designs I have seen and feels derivative, but also not a great interpretation of those other similar designs. If you are going to be derivative you should be looking to tweak and make as good or better.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 67.

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a ships decanter with a low cylindrical body and a solid stopper that mirrors the body shape. It's pattern number is FT239 and it's called the Ship's Decanter, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1979.

This is a really nice balanced design. I see a lot of them around so they must have been pretty popular. The Grey and Green versions of this decanter are much rarer, so keep an eye for those.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 83.

Reference:Miller's 20th Century Glass, page 243.

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Height: 6 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a short dark grey vase with a cylinder body and folded lip. It's pattern number is FT75, and designed by Frank Thrower in 1968.

This is quite a nice design, which I sold to a friend quite cheaply and kind of regretted it. Collectors always regret selling stuff they like no matter how much they need to make space.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 43.

Height: 6 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Dartington commemorative tankard with a wide base and an applied seal commemorating 200 years of American independence. Marked on the base No.2801 1976 and with original clear plastic label with a large gold capital D, surrounded by the words DARTINGTON ENGLAND in black. It is Dartington pattern number F1/1976 and made in 1976.

Dartington made between 5,000 and 10,000 commemorative tankards with different seals on every year. This is the 1976 version of it. If you are an obsessive kind of person you might want to try and get them all. Not me though, I'm not obsessive at all.

Reference: Dartington Glass the First Twenty Years 1967-1987, page 147.

Reference:Miller's 20th Century Glass, page 244.

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Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 5 inches

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