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IRISH CUT-GLASS DECANTERS

The attribution of Irish cut glass decanters is not as straight forward as it is for the ones with moulded bases. Most people refer to them as Anglo-Irish as craftsmen were coming over from England and bringing designs with them.

I have gone by a few criteria to include decanters in this section. There are a few designs which were common for Irish made decanters and that is one of the criteria I have used. Another is that I bought them from Ireland, and the last is that I have seen something the same in one of my Irish glass reference books.

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Decanters

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Description, References and Size

This is a barrel shaped decanter with three anulated neck rings and a mushroom stopper. The lower body is comb cut, surmounted with a band of hobnail cutting, surmounted with panel cutting that is followed through onto the shoulder of the decanter. The mushroom stopper has a hobnail cut top, serrated edge and panel cut neck. Made c.1820s-30s

This is a good solid cut glass decanter, but what is nice about this decanter is how the body and the stopper go together. It is traditional and designed at the same time.

Although I am low on direct references for this decanter, I did buy this from an antique shop in Ireland in the middle of nowhere. The ladies prices were very reasonable and I bought quite a bit of glass from her. The glass appeared to come various recently dead people, so I expect she did a lot of local probate work.

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, page 172

Height: 10.25 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with three anulated neck rings and a radially cut stopper. The lower body has interspersed comb cutting, surmounted with a band of hobnail cutting, surmounted with panel cut shoulders. Made c.1820

This is like the cheaper version of the decanter above. Everthing about it is less, the glass is thinner, the cutting less intense, the stopper is a generic one. In these pictures they are not side by side it's not obvious, but take it from me, it's obvious.

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, plate XXXI

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell, plate 26

Height: 9 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a cylinder shaped decanter with three neck rings and a mushroom bullseye stopper. The body of the decanter is cut with vertical bands of fine hobnails pillar cutting, the upper body having a horizontal band of hobnail cutting and the shoulders are panel cut. The stopper has radiating bands of fine hobnail and pillar cutting. Made c.1820s-30s.

Whilst I don't have a direct reference for this decanter as Irish I was happy to be sold it as being Irish due to the distinctive horizontal bands of hobnails and pillar cutting. I have seen this pattern variously described as Irish, and it is so distinctive that the modern Waterford factory copied it in their "Hiberian" pattern.

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, page 172

Reference: English and Irish Glass, W. A.Thorpe, figure 55A

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 199

Height: 9.25 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a cylinder decanter with combe cutting around the base, surmounted by fields of hobnail cutting, surmounted by panel cutting. The neck has two bands of fine hobnails separated by prism cutting and the mushroom stopper is topped with radiating fields of fine hobnails. Made c.1820-30

There is a bowl on plate C of the Warren Phelps book Irish glass, with the same diagonally crossing prism cutting enclosing strawberry hobnail.

From the description the design sounds like it might be craziness, but infact it looks quite a cohesive design.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 209 & 237

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 199

Height: 9 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with diagonally crossing prism cutting enclosing strawberry hobnails cutting surmounted by band of zig zag cutting intersperst with fine hobnails and fine grooves, surmounted by step cutting, surmounted by panel cutting. The neck has three annulated rings , the mushroom stopper is topped with diagonally crossing prism cutting enclosing strawberry hobnails. Made c.1820-30

There is a bowl on plate C of the Warren Phelps book Irish glass, with the same diagonally crossing prism cutting enclosing strawberry hobnail.

From the description the design sounds like it might be craziness, but infact it looks quite a cohesive design.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 209 & 237

Reference: The Arthur Negus Guide to British Glass, John Brooks, page 93

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with vertial prismative cutting separating fields of hobnails, surmounted by band of hobnails. The shoulders and neck are panel cut base with two humps, the mushroom stopper is flat cut. Made c.1820-30

There is a Prussian shaped jug with a similar treatment of the shoulders and neck in plate 54b of the Warren Phelps book Irish glass.

You may notice a metal band around the neck as there is a crack from the lip running down into the neck and there is also a metal rivett on the lip. I bought this decanter in Ireland for very little (and I mean little) and it is great piece with history. It would have been alright if it wasn't cracked, but it is great to see some period repairs too.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 209 & 237

Height: 9 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with a combe cut base and cut with arches over stars to the body and three annulated neck rings. It has a radially cut stopper with a ball knop stem. Most probably made by Penrose Waterford. c.1810-15

This is another reference piece in Irish glass with all the marked molded ones seeming to be made by Penrose Waterford. This is not a full sized decanter and that is why the neck rings appear chunky and close together.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plate 11, 13a and 51a

Reference: English and Irish Cut Glass 1750-1950, E.M. Elville, page 60

Reference: English and Irish Glass, W. A.Thorpe, figure 43(a)

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, page 89

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 237

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 183

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 58

Reference: The Arthur Negus Guide to British Glass, John Brooks, page 73

Height: 9 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with a panel cut base, four neck rings and a bullseye stopper. There is a band vesica cut around the middle within a frosted ring. Made c.1810

Possibly made in Cork due to the cut band of Vesica, I am unable to attribute this decanter more firmly to any particular Irish glass house.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a Prussian shaped decanter with a panel cut base, four neck rings and a bullseye stopper. There is a band cross hatching around the middle within a frosted ring. Made c.1810

The only reason this might possibly be made in Cork due to its similarity to the one with cut band of Vesica, I am unable to attribute this decanter more firmly to any particular Irish glass house.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

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