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IRISH GLASS

This section of my website contains a number miscellaneous Irish Glass items to assist those that think they may have some Irish glass to identifiy it. I am happy to attribute these items as I have either bought them in Ireland being told they are Irish, or I have been able to find very close representations of them in my Irish glass books.

I don't own a massive swath of Irish glass, but what I am showing here is commonly referenced Irish glass artifacts, or glass that has distinctive Irish glass motifs on them.

All of this glass is from the classic period Irish between 1783 and 1850, so don't be expecting any modern Irish glass. One reason I wouldn't collect modern Irish glass is that Irish people seem to like their home made glass, and this has given it a premium price on the second hand cut glass market. I know this as I have not only seen the premium prices in action, but I know that Irish people come around my local antiques centre buying it all up if there is any to be had. If only the English could be so loyal to their own stuff.

Glassware

This is a covered urn with a flute cut foot and stem, shallow cut hobnails to the body and combe cutting to the lip. The cover has notches cut around the rim, more shallow hobnails to the top and a pointed facted finial. Made c.1800.

I don't know the manufacturer of this covered urn.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plates 29 & 30b

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 182

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a covered urn with a press moulded foot, flutes cut to the base, shallow stars cut to the body and combe cutting to the lip. The ribbed wrythen cover has notches cut around the rim, and a facted spire finial. Made c.1790-1800

I don't know the manufacturer of this covered urn. This was an early purchase on my way to being an obsessive decanter buyer. It is just as good now as it was then, i.e. I don't think I made a bad purchase.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plates 28b

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a scent bottle with strawberry hobnails to the sides, slanting blazes to the shoulders and radially cut mushroom stopper. Made c.1820-30

This scent bottle might be made by Waterford.

I know, I know, everyone one says Waterford, but if Dudley Westropp thinks perfume bottles like this are probably Waterford, who am I to disagree with him.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plate 84c

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, plate VIII

Reference: English Bottles and Decanters 1650-1900, Derek C. Davis, Page 57

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

These are a set of six barrel bowled wine glasses with a single applied annulated knop to the stem, flute cutting to the base of the bowl, and a band of fine hobnails below the rim. Made c.1800-1810

This type of glass is widely illustrated in my books on Irish glass and they are normally attributed to Cork Glass House or Waterford, for the period 1820-1830. I have pushed mine back in time a bit for two reasons. None of the illustrated barrel bowl wine glasses with a band of fine hobnails have an applied knop on the stem but have bladed knops and also the treatment of the edge of the foot is more like late 18th century glasses were the edge sits on the table as opposed to later where the edge has a round bumper (as illustrated in the glasses below). Also two of the glasses have quite large pieces of frit in the base and two others have smaller pieces. For such fine glasses I would be surprised if this would have been allowed to pass and I have never seen in it in the later glasses.

These too were an early purchase in my glass collecting obsession. I had to have them and stuck my hand in my pocket to the tune of 120, which seemed a fortune at the time. Worth every penny.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, page 151

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell

Height: 4 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

These are a set of five round bowled wine glasses with a single faceted knop to the stem, diagonal blaze cutting to the base of the bowl, and a band of hobnails below the rim. Made c.1830

Bought in Ireland and said to have come from the collection of an Irish Judge, but I am sure the dealer said that of all of her Irish glass. She was a very nice lady though, her prices were keen and I would buy from her again.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a bucket bowled wine glass with a faceted stem, flute cut to the base of the bowl, and a band of vesica cutting with frosted glass in between the pattern. Made c.1810

Possibly made at the Cork or Waterloo glass houses due to them favouring the vesica pattern.

By lucky happenstance this glass goes with one of my Irish decanters. Ho hum, only five more to find to make a set.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a barrel bowled rummer with a single disc knop to the stem. Etched around the bowl of the glass are two meanders of foliage that cross over, with the letters IG on one side amongst a field of stars and spriggs of foliage on the glass where the meanders cross. Made c.1800

The pattern on this glass is very similar to one of the decanters in the Irish Decanters section. I am pretty certain they are from same factory and possibly etched by the same person.

You will note that there is small star crack on the bowl. For most collectors this is a massive avoid signal, but I am interested in this as it matches the decanter previously mentioned, and also because it is such a lovely glass with great naive etching on it. The other thing is if you want to learn about glass this is one way to do it

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 234

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a glass rinser with comb cutting to the base surmounted by a bordered band of cut stars and blazing stars. Made c.1810

There is a decanter marked for Waterloo Co. Cork in the Phelps Warren book with the exact same frieze around it. The same freize doesn't garantee that it's from the same factory, but there is a good chance it is.

This is not a strange finger bowl it is a glass rinser. Physically the difference is that a glass rinser has two pouring lips on opposite sides (very rarely a rinser may only have one pouring lip). The idea of this piece of tableware is that you can rest your glass in it with bowl in water and the stem of the glass sitting in the pouring lip.

I have variously seen these described as for cooling your glass or for rinsing your glass between different drinks. However it was actually used during dining, we have not used them for a long time and most people don't know what they are. The fact that they are an obsolete piece of tableware makes them cool in my book.

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell, plate 29

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plate 16A

Height: 3 inches

Length: 5 inches

This is a turn over bowl with a mould pressed square foot, the body with shallow hobnails, surmounted by cut flutes. The folded lip has been cut all over with shallow grooves. Made c.1800

I am unable to attribute this decanter more firmly to any particular Irish glass house.

The turnover bowl is an Irish classic in the glass world, especially when the glass is cut all the way around the turnover. This bowl would probably originally of has a lid to it but that has been lost somehow in the annals of time.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plates 41c,69d, & 81c

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, XX, XXI, & XXIII

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell, plates 24, & 28

Height: 4 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a salt boat or bon bon dish, with a star cut base, swags cut to the sides and notches cut to the rim. Made c.1800-1810

This dish and the one below are not quite like anything else in the books I have, but they did come from Southern Ireland, and motifs in the cutting and the fact they are boat shaped, kind of makes them distinctly Irish.

Most of the Irish boat bowls you see in books are the pedestal type with the pedestal made in press mould. The Dudley Westropp Irish Glass book has a few boat shaped bowls without pedestals but I would say his are less distinctively Irish than these.

Height: 1.5 inches

Length: 4 inches

This is a salt boat or bon bon dish, with a star cut base, a row of husks cut to the sides and notches cut to the rim. Made c.1800-1810

The row of husks cutting pattern is a distinctly Irish pattern and can be seen on one on the Belfast decanters I have in the Irish Decanters section of the website.

I have put these early dates on these based on the fact that the cutting is spare, leaving a lot of natural glass. This seems to be true of the decanter date, so I have dated these similarly.

Height: 1.5 inches

Length: 4 inches

This is a condiment jar base, with radially cut foot, slice cut stem, and round bowl with hobnails surmounted by flute cutting. The everted lip has been cut into petals with with radiating grooves cut in them. Made c.1820-30

This jar should have a lid that would have rested on the inner edge of the everted lid. In the Dudley Westropp, Irish Glass book similar glass is shown from factory drawings, these glasses were called Pickle Glasses at the time.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plates 42a, & 69d

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, plate XXXIV, & page 232

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell, plate 41

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a pedestal salt boat with lemon squeeze, diamond profile press moulded pedestall, a scalloped rim, and cut with very shallow grooves of diagonal crosses. Made c.1790-1800

I have put quite an early date on this salt boat due to the very tentative nature of the cutting.

I have quite a few similar salt boats, but this one came from Ireland so I am happy to put it in this section. Also, the row of diagonal crosses in another mofit that crops up in Irish glass.

If you are really unlucky I may get around to putting my salt boat collection on the website.

Height: 3 inches

Length: 3.5 inches

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