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IRISH GLASSES

This section of my website contains a number miscellaneous Irish Glass items to assist those that think they may have some Irish glass to identifiy it. I am happy to attribute these items as I have either bought them in Ireland being told they are Irish, or I have been able to find very close representations of them in my Irish glass books.

I don't own a massive swath of Irish glass, but what I am showing here is commonly referenced Irish glass artifacts, or glass that has distinctive Irish glass motifs on them.

All of this glass is from the classic period Irish between 1783 and 1850, so don't be expecting any modern Irish glass. One reason I wouldn't collect modern Irish glass is that Irish people seem to like their home made glass, and this has given it a premium price on the second hand cut glass market. I know this as I have not only seen the premium prices in action, but I know that Irish people come around my local antiques centre buying it all up if there is any to be had. If only the English could be so loyal to their own stuff.

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Glasses

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Description, References and Size

This is a covered urn with a flute cut foot and stem, shallow cut hobnails to the body and combe cutting to the lip. The cover has notches cut around the rim, more shallow hobnails to the top and a pointed facted finial. Made c.1800.

I don't know the manufacturer of this covered urn.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plates 29 & 30b

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 182

Reference: English and Irish Glass, W. A. Thorpe, Fig.31

Height: 8.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a covered urn with a press moulded foot, flutes cut to the base, shallow stars cut to the body and combe cutting to the lip. The ribbed wrythen cover has notches cut around the rim, and a facted spire finial. Made c.1790-1800

I don't know the manufacturer of this covered urn. This was an early purchase on my way to being an obsessive decanter buyer. It is just as good now as it was then, i.e. I don't think I made a bad purchase.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plates 28b

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 337

Reference: English and Irish Glass, W. A. Thorpe, Fig.31

Reference: Early English Glass, D. Wilmer, page 199

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a barrel bowled wine glasse with a single applied annulated knop to the stem, flute cutting to the base of the bowl, and a band of fine hobnails below the rim. Made c.1800-1810

This type of glass is widely illustrated in my books on Irish glass and they are normally attributed to Cork Glass House or Waterford, for the period 1820-1830. I have pushed mine back in time a bit for two reasons. None of the illustrated barrel bowl wine glasses with a band of fine hobnails have an applied knop on the stem but have bladed knops and also the treatment of the edge of the foot is more like late 18th century glasses were the edge sits on the table as opposed to later where the edge has a round bumper (as illustrated in the glasses below). Also two of the glasses have quite large pieces of frit in the base and two others have smaller pieces. For such fine glasses I would be surprised if this would have been allowed to pass and I have never seen in it in the later glasses.

These too were an early purchase in my glass collecting obsession. I had to have them and stuck my hand in my pocket to the tune of 120, which seemed a fortune at the time. Worth every penny.

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren

Reference: Irish Glass, Dudley Westropp, plate XXXIII

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell

Height: 4 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a round bowled wine glass with a single faceted knop to the stem, diagonal blaze cutting to the base of the bowl, and a band of hobnails below the rim. Made c.1830

Bought in Ireland and said to have come from the collection of an Irish Judge, but I am sure the dealer said that of all of her Irish glass. She was a very nice lady though, her prices were keen and I would buy from her again.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a bucket bowled wine glass with a faceted stem, flute cut to the base of the bowl, and a band of vesica cutting with frosted glass in between the pattern. Made c.1810

Possibly made at the Cork or Waterloo glass houses due to them favouring the vesica pattern.

By lucky happenstance this glass goes with one of my Irish decanters. Ho hum, only five more to find to make a set.

Height: 3.5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a barrel bowled rummer with a single disc knop to the stem. Engraved around the bowl of the glass are two meanders of foliage that cross over, with the letters IG on one side amongst a field of stars and spriggs of foliage on the glass where the meanders cross. Made c.1800

The pattern on this glass is very similar to one of the decanters in the Irish Decanters section. I am pretty certain they are from same factory and possibly engraved by the same person.

You will note that there is small star crack on the bowl. For most collectors this is a massive avoid signal, but I am interested in this as it matches the decanter previously mentioned, and also because it is such a lovely glass with great naive engraving on it. The other thing is if you want to learn about glass this is one way to do it

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, page 234

Height: 5.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is an Anglo/Irish rummer with an cup bowl and pillar stem with a faceted knop. The bowl is swags, surmounted by diamonds encompassing a field of fine hobnails, surmounted with vertical blazes. Made circa. 1820.

I am saying this is Anglo/Irish on the basis of all of the cut features on it. Although I don't have a direct reference for this glass, the features I describe all appear either on glass I know to be Irish or that is in the reference books as Irish.

Height: 5 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is an Irish dram glass with an cup bowl a bordered band of cut blazing stars. Made circa. 1810.

There is a decanter marked for Waterloo Co. Cork in the Phelps Warren book with the exact same frieze around it. The same freize doesn't garantee that it's from the same factory, but there is a good chance it is.

Reference: Irish Glass (pamphlet), Mary Boydell, plate 29

Reference: Irish Glass, Phelps Warren, plate 16A

Height: 3.75 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a Irish funnel bowl wine glass, engraved with swags that encompass cross hatching surmounting three sprigs. Made circa. 1780.

I don't have a reference of this glass but I have only seen this engraved sprig motif on Irish decanters with a combe moulded base.

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

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