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JOHN WALSH WALSH TABLEWARE

Unfortunately John Walsh Walsh glass seems to be less common, so this is what I have, and even then I can't give all of this a firm attribution. Even though I have been trying to learn the patterns from the books I am just not seeing it out there.

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Glass

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Description, References and Size

This is a yellow Opaline Brocade wavy fan vase. Made circa.1900.

I did mention that John Walsh Walsh produced some fantastic glass and this is an example of it. I originally had this photographed here against a white background and it looked really flat, however, once you put it against a dark background it really pops out and looks beautiful.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 13, 42 & 43.

Reference: British Glass 1800-1915, Charles Hajdamach, page 319.

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a John Walsh Walsh wine glass with wrythen bowls each with fours dimples, on slim stems. The glass is in the John Walsh Walsh catalogue listed as, "The Venetian Suite". Made circa.1900-1930.

These glasses are regularly attributed to Whitefriars but they are not in the Whitefriars book and the ones in the Walsh Walsh book are marked pieces and I have seen them on sale as marked pieces. There is also a 1927 John Walsh Walsh advert with these glasses pictured. So whilst none the glasses that I have with this pattern are marked I am happy go with this attribution.

I thought there would be a more elegant word than dent, but looking in the books with this type of glass, and dents it is.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 32.

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 52.

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Langbridge, chapter 1902

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a John Walsh Walsh custard cup with a wrythen bowl with fours dimples, on a slim stem. Made circa.1900-1930.

This glass is not in the book, but comparing with the other glasses in this suite it is clearly from the same stable. I really like the touch with the old school Georgian style handles with the piggy tails.

Custard cups are small short glasses with handles, sometimes with a stem and sometimes without, that are used for a small pudding like custard. I know from experience that the handles are incredibly delicate, so that the ones you do see are survivors from the crowd.

Height: 4.25 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a tumbler glass with a wrythen body and four dimples. The tumbler is in the John Walsh Walsh catalogue listed as, "The Venetian Suite". Made circa.1900-1930.

This tumbler came as a part of a job lot with the above glasses so if they going to be John Walsh Walsh these tumblers must be too.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 32.

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 52.

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a tumbler glass with a wrythen body and four dimples. The tumbler is in the John Walsh Walsh catalogue listed as, "The Venetian Suite". Made circa.1900-1930.

You may be a little bit surprised to see this picture, but no matter what I did, I couldn't get a good picture of what the glass was like against a neutral background. So when I said it's wrythen I mean it has this twisted optical pattern that creates this lovely diamond effect when look through both sides of the glass. The other dimple glasses and the jug have the same wrythen effect.

I am a real person, because that's my hand.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 32.

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 52.

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a small round jug with a wryrthen body, and four dimples. The handle is applied top to bottom and has a right angle. Made circa.1900.

This jug is a part of a glass service I have that has decanter, carafes, tumblers and wine glasses. I believe this type jug was for watering your whiskey.

This jug is not in any John Walsh Walsh references I have or listed as a part of "The Venetian Suite", however, I find it difficult to believe "The Venetian Suite" did not include jugs, carafes etc.., particularly as I know it included smaller decanters that are also not included in the advertising.

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a finger bowl with a wrythen body and undulating rim. The finger bowl is in the John Walsh Walsh catalogue listed as, "The Venetian Suite". Made circa.1900.

These finger bowls are nearly always described as Whitefriars, but they are not in Whitefriars books and they are in the John Walsh Walsh book, and to me that makes them John Walsh Walsh.

I hope you will forgive this photograph but even in reality they look a little like a floppy piece of glass, and it was difficult to get the light and angle so it actually looks like a bowl.

Reference: The Glass of John Walsh Walsh 1850-1951, Eric Reynolds, page 33.

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 52.

Reference: Edwardian Shopping, R H Langbridge, chapter 1902

Height: 5.75 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

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