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SALVIATI

I have to admit that I know next to nothing about Salviati. They are from Murano, an island off the coast of Venice in Italy and for quite a while they produced Venetian renaissance glass.

As I have said I don't know much about Salviati, but if you Google them you can see the style they went for, and it is what makes them easy to pick out. You only have to handle a few pieces to know them in the crowd. Their new designs do seem to blend in with the crowd and I don't really know them.

Bowls

This is a pyramidal soda glass claret jug in clear glass that has been blown after being coated in gold leaf. It has a scrolling handle with applied rigaree, and a stopper shaped to match the jug. Made circa 1890-60.

This claret jug has been made in the style of Venetian renaissance glass. It is very frilly and pretty but totally impractical as a claret jug. The glass is paper thin and I doubt the gold leaf embedded in it does anything for its structural strength either. Just for looks.

Salviati was all about hot working the glass. All of the decorative are done whilst the glass is still molten. The pontil is a broken pontil and the stopper is loose fitting so no cutting what so ever.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a soda glass comport in clear glass that has been blown after being coated in gold leaf. The bowl and foot of the comport have also been coated in particals of red glass that have been fused to the surface before being blown. The bowl is also rib moulded. The wrythen baluster stem has an applied ring of frilled glass. Made circa 1890-60.

This piece has had even more hot working techniques thrown at it than the claret jug. The stem alone appears to be made of four pieces of glass and there is a broken pontil in the middle of the bowl as well as on the base.

In this piece it seems that the odd stray bit of yellow and white glass has got into the red particles. To me this conjures up a hot dirty place full of skilled sweaty men trying to create beauty out of bits of molten sand. As this has two pontil marks I suspect this took 2 or 3 men to make.

This belongs to my wife, so I would like to thank her letting my put this on the web site.

Height: 6.75 inches

Width: 9 inches

This is a glass goblet in clear glass that has been blown after being coated in gold leaf. It has an octagonal bowl with an inverted trailed tear of glass near the bottom of each side, and round wrythen knop on the stem. Made circa 1890-60.

This is fairly standard wares for Salviati and I have seen this same goblet in pale blue and pale green glass. Saying it is standard wares doesn't make it any less nice, and whilst I wouldn't say these goblets are common, that fact that I have seen them quite a bit of over the years says they were either made intensively for a short period of time or were popular for quite a while. I tend to favour the latter.

Although I have no reference for this glass, all the dealers usually sell them either as just Murano or as Salviati, I am willing to go with Salviati because the glass quality/technique is to similar.

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 3.75 inches

This is a footed finger bowl in a white opal glass that has been blown after being coated in gold leaf. An applied thin wavy ring of glass has been applied around the body of the bowl, the base of bowl has petal moulding and the foot of the bowl has been formed by applying a ring of glass. Made circa 1945-60.

Although this is opal glass the one in the Miller's book I am referencing is dark blue. I would expect there to be other colours, most likely being like the red one pictured below.

This belongs to my wife, so I would like to thank her letting my put this on the web site.

Reference: Miller's 20th Century Glass, Andy McConnell, page 84

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 2 inches

This is a footed sugar bowl in a white opal glass that has been blown after being coated in gold leaf. The rim of the bowl has been pinched in on six sides, and the foot of the bowl has been formed by clenching the base of the bowl. Made circa 1890-60.

The foot of this bowl and the one below are made in the same by squeezing the base of the bowl. I have seen this technique before, but to my eyes it has major downside, it creates a dirt trap at the bottom of the bowl. I know this seems mundane but if you are actually planning on using bowls made like this, it's a pain in the arse, and if you are going to eat your pudding or something out of it not very hygenic.

This belongs to my wife, so I would like to thank her letting my put this on the web site.

Height: 5.5 inches

Width: 2.75 inches

This is a footed sugar bowl in a red glass that has been blown after being coated in gold leaf. The foot of the bowl has been formed by clenching the base of the bowl. Made circa 1945-60.

This looks like a very pain thing, which it is, but it screams of quality, due to the gold leaf and fineness of the glass. Someone had missed what a good thing this is, so I picked it from an antiques centre for next to nothing. The lesson is if you see a window sill packed with glass have a good look as it may not all be rubbish.

Height: 4.45 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

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