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STEVENS AND WILLIAMS DECANTERS

This is probably one of my most sketchy sections in my web site. There is no book for Stevens and Williams and references to them are few and far between. There are a couple of decanters where I really know, but for some I am relying on what appears to be concensus of various dealers and auction houses on the Internet. As I know them to be wrong so often I will let you know which are not properly referenced pieces.

What I do know of Stevens and Williams is that they made a lot of very high quality glass that is financially out of my league unless I get lucky.

Decanters

A ships decanter with a plain body and the three neck rings are true applied neck rings. The stopper is a cut bullseye. Designed by T. Jones of Stevens and Williams Ltd. in 1963.

An elegant plain decanter in the style of Georgian ship decanters, circa.1800. The key difference between this decanter and the Georgian ones is that the stopper is not a true disc as the antique bullseye stoppers are and has a clean polished peg. This decanter also has very little wear to the base, and none of the scratches and scuffs that comes with 200 years of use.

Beware dealers either through ignorance or mischief occasionally try to sell these and similarly new decanters as Georgian. Real Georgian ship decanters like this are pretty rare and so command stiff prices. Before you part with your money, get it in your hands and think carefully, does this look 200 years old. The stopper peg should not be shiny and polished.

It should be noted that from 1931 Stevens and Williams Ltd. were selling their glass under the name Royal Brierley, and some of these decanters may have etched Royal Brierley underneath.

Reference: English and Irish Glass, Geoffrey Wills, part 16, page 9.

Height: 10.5 inches

Width: 7 inches

This is a conical decanter, with a black glass stopper and clear glass body. The body of the decanter has acid parallels lines zig zagging across it. Made circa.1935.

Reference: British Glass Between the Wars, Dudley Leisure Services. page 11.

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a rhomboid shaped decanter, with a black painted stopper and clear glass body. It has horizontal bands etched on it that were probably originally painted black. Designed by Keith Murray for Stevens and Williams of Brierley Hill in 1933, pattern number KM 371a.

Keith Murray was one of the foremost designers in the Art Deco style and designed for Stevens and Williams from 1932 to 1939. Keith Murray was such a prolific designer that only a dozen of many of the decanters he designed were manufactured, consequently this might be quite rare.

I have seen a very similar decanter with vertical lines and a silver painted stopper. As this is a mold blown decanter and the molds were relatively expensive to make, I suspect the same mold was untilised with various patterns painted and etched on it.

It is not usual for me to put my trust in auction houses, but I would like to thank Fieldings Auctioneers for the pattern number. As they are in Stourbridge I presume they have better reference material than me.

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 2 1987. page 57.

Reference: The Decanter, Andy McConnell, Page 505.

Reference: Christies Collecting Decanters, Jane Hollingworth.

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a cased glass decanter of amethyst over clear glass intaglio cut with grapes and vine leaves with four dimples to the body. The blown mushroom stopper is is also radially cut to the top. Possibly made by Stevens and Williams circa 1900-1910.

This is a beautiful quality decanter that was made in other variations, as I have seen numerous versions of this decanter in different colours and with different motifs. It is most regulary ascribed to the maker Stevens and Williams but I have yet to see a real reference for it.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a tapered decanter with molded spiral ridges running down the body with notches cut into the tops of the ridges. The stopper is a flattened leaf shape that has been twisted into a spiral with notches cut in the edge. Made possibly make by Stevens and Williams circa 1900.

I am sure that somewhere in my reference library I have seen this described as a Stevens and Williams decanter. Whoever made it, it is a very together design with the notched spiral motif following up the body and onto the stopper.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is an inverted thistle shaped rib molded claret jug with script Whiskey cut into the upper half of the body. There is a rib molded blown ball stopper. Made by Stevens and Williams circa 1900.

The word Whiskey is not very clear in this photograph and it is difficult to read in real life too. There are versions of this jug on coloured cased glass where the word is cut through coloured glass into clear glass and this is much more successful.

Although this is a lovely jug, I don't think it was a successful design, in that the quite chunky stopper fits tightly into the thin rim of the pouring lip. As this is meant to be for Whiskey that doesn't seem a very robust solution and I expect these were destroyed the people using them by the dozen.

I have seen this design in an old Stevens and Williams advertisement, so I am certain of this attribution. In the advertisment the rib molding is called Venetian flute.

Height: 11 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a large fruit bowl, made with pink and green glass that forms a large spiral pattern, from the Rainbow glass range. Made circa.1930s-50s.

Reference: British Glass Between the Wars, Dudley Leisure Services. page 11.

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4 inches

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