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STROMBERGSHYTTAN GLASSWARE

I don't have that much Strombergshyttan glassware, but that which I do have, is solid good quality stuff. I especially like the Osborne tumblers and use them.

The colour names I have used here are the colour names given in the Elfverson catalogue from the 1930s.

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Glass

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Description, References and Size

This is an optically molded "Straw" jug. Elfverson pattern number E.517. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

As per the other glass, this jug has the same soft shape but what you can't tell from the picture is that the jug is designed to hold 3.5 pints, so it is pretty big. You are going to need strong wrists to pour it.

Like the vase above it has six vertical optical panels.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 43

Height: 11 inches

Width: 7.5 inches

This is a rib molded "Straw" short tumbler, with a solid footed base. Described in the Elfverson catalogue as Cocktail Hakon. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

This is one of the glasses that came with the E.624 decanter. In the reference I have the glasses portrayed with the E.624 are stemmed and these glasses are on the next page, however they are the same colour, and have a similar molded rib pattern, so I am happy that these were most likely originally purchased together.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 60

Height: 2.5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a small lobed "Straw" whiskey tumbler. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

This tumbler goes with the "Straw" Osborne decanter from the decanter section. For such small glasses they are surprisingly solid.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a small lobed "Straw" whiskey tumbler with a gilt rim. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

This isn't the same glass from a different angle but a minor variation on the other. I have seen others of these glasses but these are the only ones I have seen with gilt rims. As with the "Smokey Amethyst" Osborne decanter, is seems a bit unnecessary.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a lobed "Elfverson Blue" whiskey tumbler with a gilt rim. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

The previous two Osborne tumblers are quite small. Just about big enough for a whiskey with a cube of ice. This tumbler is much bigger and really heavy, more of a gin and tonic size. As I have already mentioned I do use these glasses and they are great to use if you are man. My wife doesn't like them as they are too big and heavy for her hands. This colour is the best as it has beautiful refractive qualities.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a lobed "Silver" Osborne whiskey tumbler. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

I don't have much to say here apart from this is another colour. In addition to this colour they might also come in "Smokey Amethyst", "Clear" and "Tormaline Green"

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 4.5 inches

Width: 3.55 inches

This is a "Straw" drawn bowl claret glass. Elfverson pattern number: BO/912. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

This glass goes with this the tall slim decanter that you can see in the decanter section. In the catalogue there is a whole suite of different types of glass but I think this is the claret glass.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 54

Height: 7 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a "Elfverson Blue" goblet, with a ogee shaped optically molded bowl and inverse baluster stem. Elfverson pattern number: P.J./912, also known as a Saro goblet. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

If you are a big drinker these are great glasses to dring wine out of. It you are patient it is possible to make a service and I have them in the "Straw" colour too.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 57

Height: 5 inches

Width: 3 inches

This is a ribbed ogee wine glass with a black foot. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke or Gerda Stromberg in the 1930s.

I don't really have a proper reference for this glass. A set of glasses came with the decanter with the black stopper. They appear to be of the same suite so I am presuming they are.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 67

Height: 5 inches

Width: 3 inches

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