BACK

STROMBERGSHYTTAN

Strombergshyttan is not a well known name that trips off the end of your tongue, but they have been exporting glass to the UK since at least the 1930s when a businessman and designer called Hugh Dunne Cooke took over an import company called Elfverson and started commissioning designs for Strombergshyttan to export to the UK. The designs were of the new Swedish minimalist style that was influencing design across Europe including the UK. Some of those designs were entirely his and some were existing or variations of existing Strombergshyttan home market glass.

The small amount of Stromsbergshyttan glass I have here is from that period when Hugh Dunne Cooke was importing Strombergshyttan glass to the UK. The glass is in soft muted colours with soft muted shapes to go with it.

I don't have much reference material on this glass manufacturer and if you are interested, I would suggest you join the Facebook Group; Strombergshyttan Glass.

Glass

This is a large pale brown tapered decanter. Elfverson pattern number E.636. Possibly designed by Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

This must be about as minimalist a design as you can get, and you can see it sitting on the dining table in some smart minimalist apartment. Although it is minimalist, it is not machine made, and it a quality man made item.

The copy of the Elfverson catalogue reproduced in the Glass Association Journal mentions a few different colours. The colour they use that would appear to match this pale brown colour is called "Straw".

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4.75 inches

This is a rib molded pale brown decanter, the solid stopper mirrors the shape of the decanter body and has polished flat top. Elfverson pattern number E.624. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

Slightly less minimalist than the decanter above in that this has a distinct shape.

This decanter is similar to some of the Whitefriars patterns of the time. A key element of with Whitefriars is their stopper pegs are cut with more precision than decanters. Note how the stopper has a slight taper towards the base, Whitefriars stopper pegs have square cut ends with a slight bevel on them. Also I have not found this shade of brown being used by UK manufacturers.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 59

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a rib molded pale brown short tumbler, with a solid footed base. Described in the Elfverson catalogue as Cocktail Hakon. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

This is one of the glasses that came with the E.624 decanter. In the reference I have the glasses portrayed with the E.624 are stemmed and these glasses are on the next page, however they are the same colour, and have a similar molded rib pattern, so I am happy that these were most likely originally purchased together.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 60

Height: 2.5 inches

Width: 2.25 inches

This is a rib molded pale brown decanter, with a wide solid mushroom stopper. Elfverson pattern number 2038 and has Y3 scratched into the pontil mark. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

This decanter breaks the etiquette of mushroom stoppered decanters where the norm is that the stopper is about the same width of the lip of the decanter. In Strombergshyttan's case the mushroom stoppers are wider than the lip of the decanter on a regular basis and somehow it looks alright.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 57

Height: 10 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is an optically molded light grey vase with a scalloped rim. Elfverson pattern number 3050. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

As per the decanters this vase Hugh Dunne Cooke designed is a soft shape and the colour is so muted as to be almost not there.

The vase has six vertical optical panels, so when seen from above you can see they make a rounded hexagon shape.

Although very pale, when put against clear glass, this vase definitely has a colour. It is probably the colour Elfverson refer to as "Silver".

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 43

Height: 7.5 inches

Width: 6 inches

This is an optically molded pale brown jug. Elfverson pattern number E.517. Designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

As per the other glass, this jug has the same soft shape but what you can't tell from the picture is that the jug is designed to hold 3.5 pints, so it is pretty big. You are going to need strong wrists to pour it.

Like the vase above it has six vertical optical panels.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 43

Height: 11 inches

Width: 7.5 inches

This is a lobed pale brown decanter, with a wide solid mushroom stopper. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

This decanter seems to be the one everyone wants, and it has quite a cool and different design.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 10 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a lobed pale brown decanter, with a wide solid mushroom stopper and a gilt ring on the neck. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

There are a couple of things different about this decanter than the one above. First it is a different shade of pale brown and this colour was known as smokey amethyst. This decanter also came in the pale blue colour and I have also seen one in dark green, but it was in Sweden and that colour may not have been imported to the UK. The other thing is the gilt ring on the neck. I don't why it seems superflous.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 10 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a lobed pale brown whiskey tumbler. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

This tumbler goes with the above decanter. For such small glasses they are surprisingly solid.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

This is a lobed pale brown whiskey tumbler with a gilt rim. Elfverson gave this pattern the name Osborne. Possibly designed by Hugh Dunne Cooke in the 1930s.

This isn't the same glass from a different angle but a minor variation on the other. I have seen others of these glasses but these are the only ones I have seen with gilt rims. As with the smokey amethyst decanter, is seems a bit unnecessary.

Reference: The Journal of The Glass Association Journal Volume 8 2008, Page 58

Height: 3.25 inches

Width: 2.5 inches

BACK

2015 AND BEYOND COPYRIGHT RETAINED ON ALL TEXT AND IMAGES ON THIS SITE.