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WEBB CORBETT DECANTERS

As you look though the Webb Corbett decanters I have, you will notice they have a look to them. It is not that all Webb Corbett decanters are like these, it is just that I like these ones.

I hope you don't mind me harking on about design with these decanters, but these are relatively modern, and at this end of the field design becomes very important. There are loads of modern decanters out there of a similar quality and in perfect condition, so when you are buying something that is only just removed from second-hand you should think about design. My feeling is, always go for something that is in period, i.e. modern design to when it was made. Modern traditional cut decanters is really design by numbers if I am being cruel.

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Various

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Description, References and Size

This is a conical decanter, with a flat disc mushroom stopper. It has a polished pontil, five bands of cut ellipses around the neck, and eight horizontal wavy grooves cut around the body. This was designed in 1933 by Herbert Webb, factory pattern number 14089.

This first decanter in this section might be considered elegant by most standards but is positively dumpy when compared with the rest here. Dumpy or not it is still a great design and would go as far to say an iconic design.

Reference: British Glass Between the Wars, Roger Dodsworth, page 101

Reference: 20th Century Factory Glass, Leslie Jackson, page 229

Reference: Art Deco to Post Moderism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 24

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, page 406

Reference: Factory Pamphlet, 100 Years of Webb Corbett 1897-1997

Height: 9.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a cylindrical decanter, with cut horizontal bars intersperced with layered arches and a slice cut neck. The stopper is cut hexagonal column. Marked Webb Corbett, designed by Freda M. Coleborn ARCA, made circa. 1938.

Designed by a woman and before the war, so Webb Corbett is pushing the boundaries a little. Personally I don't think this design is as strong some of those by the men. If you look further down this list you will see a design by Irene Stevens, who became Webb Corbetts chief designer in the post war era. I think Irene Stevens is a lot bolder. If you are comparing women designers, it's a bit like comparing Susie Cooper and Clarice Cliff, Susie Cooper is a bit twee and Clarice Cliffe is out of the box. It as clearly rated at the time as it's in The Studio Decorative Arts Yearbook.

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 25

Reference: The Studio Decorative Arts Yearbook 1938, Page 113

Height: 11.25 inches

Width: 4.5 inches

This is a conical decanter, with a flat disc mushroom stopper. It has a polished pontil, four downward pointing stylised elongated wheat-ears patterns running down the body overlaying six horizontal wavy grooves. Factory pattern number 14837. It has an etched makers mark, WEBB CORBETT MADE IN ENGLAND that was used from 1930-1947.

I have seen the elongated wheat-ear pattern on a slightly different design attributed to Irene Stevens, so I am presuming this is her design. I have also seen this pattern listed in the some glass replacement services as "WEC14" so this pattern was made up until relatively recently.

As Irene Stevens took up residence as Webb Corbett's designer in 1946 and this mark was supposed to have ceased in use in 1947, it puts the making of this decanter into quite a short timeframe. Alternatively they used this mark for longer than the books imply.

The etched mark on this decanter can be referenced in the books "British Glass between the wars" and "Miller's '20s and '30s Glass".

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles Hajdamach, page 277

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 63.

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 24

Height: 11.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a conical decanter, with a flat disc mushroom stopper with stylised foliage cut into the top. It has a polished pontil, cut with bands of horizontal fine grooves intertwined with and topped by stylised foliage. Made circa 1930s.

This pattern is cut into the same chasis as the decanter above. I am certain it's a much rarer pattern than that above as this is the only one I have seen. In life this feels like a more expensive thing, but this is not the one in all the reference books so I expect the one above holds a bit of premium over this one.

I have kept the same references as this decanter is based on the same chasis.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles Hajdamach, page 277

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 63.

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 24

Height: 11.5 inches

Width: 4.25 inches

This is a conical decanter, with a flat disc mushroom stopper. It has a polished pontil, and the design is a series of arches drawn with four parallel finely cut grooves. Made circa 1930s.

This pattern is cut into the same chasis as the decanter above, but on a smaller scale. Again I am certain it's a much rarer pattern than the one above with wavey lines as this is the only one I have seen. The cutting on this one is very fine, but it's difficult to tell as you can't see how small this decanter by comparison with the two above.

Again I have kept the same references as this decanter is based on the same shape.

Reference: 20th Century British Glass, Charles Hajdamach, page 277

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: The Journal of the Glass Association, Volume 5 1997, page 63.

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 24

Height: 8.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a conical decanter, with deep cut chevrons to the body, panel cut neck and no pouring lip. The stopper is made up four staked cylinders of decreasing size. It has a star cut pontil. Unmarked, made circa. 1930s.

This is a very unusual decanter, but also a rather fantastic one. It is clearing out there to push the design boundary of art deco decanters, as I have not seen this stopper design used anywhere else, and it's more like an outsized perfume bottle.

I think this is quite a rare decanter and the only reference I have is in a museum produced pamphlet. So saying they will probably start showing up left right and centre now.

Reference: Factory Pamphlet, 100 Years of Webb Corbett 1897-1997

Height: 14.5 inches

Width: 5 inches

This is a conical decanter, with pointed stopper. It has a polished pontil, four bands of cut ellipses near the base, downward pointing cut fern pattern, under a band of fine hobnail cutting and slice cut neck. The pointed stopper is cut to echo the fine hobnail and fern pattern. It has an etched makers mark, Webb Corbett Made in England that was used from 1930-1947.

If Art Deco decanters are supposed to be elegant and geometric this fits the bill. Whilst it is tall it is also quite slender and would probably not take a whole bottle. The design seems to fit with the work of Irene Stevens, but I haven't seen this pattern referenced anywhere.

The etched mark on this decanter can be referenced in the books "British Glass between the wars" and "Miller's '20s and '30s Glass".

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Height: 13.5 inches

Width: 4 inches

This is a tapered decanter, with a column shaped stopper with horizontal ellipses cut into it. The body has a polished pontil, and vertically looping design with stylised leaves to the body and five rows of horizontal ellipses cut to the neck. It has an etched makers mark, WEBB CORBETT MADE IN ENGLAND that was used from 1930-1947. Wysteria pattern designed by Irene Stevens.

This is a really nice design by Irene Stevens. I haven't seen many of these for sale and I would say this is one to watch out for, because the design is so strong. Check out the glasses section as I have a glass to go with it.

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 28

Reference: The Decanter Ancient to Modern, Andy McConnell, Page 458

Height: 13.75 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a tapered decanter, with a column shaped stopper with horizontal ellipses cut into it. The body has a polished pontil, and vertical bamboo like foliage surmounted by five rows of horizontal ellipses cut to the neck. It has an etched makers mark, WEBB CORBETT MADE IN ENGLAND that was used from 1930-1947.

This is another beautiful decanter, I have never seen before and only because the previous decanter has been attributed to Irene Stevens can I attribute this one to her too. Oh please, can someone produce a good reference book for this. I have a full time job and can't do it myself.

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 28

Height: 13.75 inches

Width: 3.25 inches

This is a tapered decanter, with a panel cut column shaped stopper. It has a polished pontil, and a complex repeating pattern of cut squares and arches with a panel cut neck. It has an etched makers mark, WEBB CORBETT MADE IN ENGLAND that was used from 1930-1947.

I have seen this design attributed to Herbert Webb on eBay along with a reference to a glass trade magazine. Obviously you would have to totally trust the seller, judging by their other items they did seem knowledgeable. I can only recommend eBay as a semi-trustworthy source of information as there are so many sellers that are clueless or wanting to "big up" an item. I am not in a hurry to sell my collection, so you can be assured; my mistakes are purely ignorance on my part.

Coming back to the decanter in question, the cutting steps away from traditional patterns and so for that reason I rate it as a good thing.

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 27

Height: 13.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a tapered decanter, with a panel cut column shaped stopper. It has a polished pontil, and a pattern of interlocking upturned curves and panel cut neck. It has an etched makers mark, WEBB CORBETT MADE IN ENGLAND that was used from 1930-1947.

I have no idea who designed this as it is the only one I have seen. I got it cheap and spotted it on shape alone and when I got it home found the mark. Like the decanter above the cutting steps away from the traditional patterns and makes a bold statement. You can the hand of a designer at work.

Reference: Millar's Glass of the '20s & '30s, Frankie Leibe

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 27

Height: 13.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a tapered decanter, with a panel cut column shaped stopper. It has a star cut base, large cut printies near the base, surmounted by vertical grooves. Made post 1947.

I have seen this pattern listed in the some glass replacement services as "Kensington" so this pattern was made up until relatively recently. It is not marked like the other pieces, and the star cut base marks it out as different from the other two decanters that were blown in the same mould. In the quality glass making business, new moulds for new designs are an expensive investment; consequently new patterns were simply cut into existing shapes. Decanter shapes can go on for decades.

Somehow this decanter doesn't seem such a successful pattern as the previous two in the same shape. It seems to attempt to be modern but the star cut base seems to rob it of some umph the other designs have.

Reference: Art Deco to Post Modernism, Nigel Benson and Jeanette Hayhurst, Page 27

Height: 13.25 inches

Width: 3.5 inches

This is a footed elipse shaped decanter, with a frieze of slanting ellipses cut near the base with fine grooves cut slating from the top of each ellipse. The solid stopper is pear shaped. This is the Webb Corbett pattern called "Pirouette". Made post WWII.

I am not 100% certain about this decanter other than I have seen the pattern on a cut glass replacement website which had line drawings from a catalogue of numerous patterns and this appeared to be one of them. Not a great reference but the best I can do. Not a genius decanter, but it had been sitting in a local antiques centre for ages asking me to buy it, and I paid hardly anything for it

Height: 12 inches

Width: 4 inches

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